Tous les articles par Piroska Nagy

VII INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL MEETING LLEIDA 26th-28th June 2017 SPECIAL STRAND 2017 « FEELINGS IN THE MIDDLE AGES »

VII INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL MEETING LLEIDA

26th-28th June 2017
SPECIAL STRAND 2017 « FEELINGS IN THE MIDDLE AGES »
pour le programme, cliquez ici
Autrement dit, l’historien.ne de l’émotion a l’embarras du choix: les mêmes jours, trois colloques internationaux se tiennent autour des émotions en Europe : Umea, York, Lleida !

Powerful Emotions / Emotions & Power c. 400-1850

L’Université de York (GB) et l’ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions organise un colloque sur ce sujet les 28-29 juin 2017 à York.

capture-decran-2017-02-03-a-08-59-20

‘Emotional control is the real site of the exercise of power’ (William Reddy, 1997)

Scholars across the humanities and social sciences are increasingly turning their attention to the affective dimension of power, and the way in which emotions are implicit in the exercise of power in all its forms. The language of power has long been used to calibrate the impact of emotions – feelings ‘shake’ and ‘grip’ us; we read of and recall moments when passions convulsed communities and animated violent actions. Strategic displays of emotion have regularly been used for the exercise and negotiation of power.

This conference will draw on a broad range of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary expertise to address the relationships between two fundamental concepts in social and historical inquiry: power and emotion. How are historical forms of cultural, social, religious, political and soft power linked with the expression, performance and control of emotions? How has power been negotiated and resisted through expressions of emotions? How have emotional cultures sustained or been produced by particular structures of power? How have understandings and expressions of emotion played out within cross-cultural encounters and conflicts? What has been the relationship between intimate, personal feeling and its public, collective manifestations?

Literary and artistic works as well as objects of diverse kinds are often said to produce or to have elicited powerful emotions. Yet how has this varied across time, space, cultures and gender? What visual, verbal and gestural rhetorics have been considered to act most potently upon the emotions in different periods? How have these conventions related to ideas of the inexpressibility of powerful or traumatic emotional experience, its resistance to aesthetic articulation? What are the implications of this for the recoverability of past emotional experience? And how does the study of the power of feeling relate to more traditionally social conceptions of hierarchy, society, and power? What new understandings of the workings of power do we gain through the perspective of a history of emotions?

This interdisciplinary conference is jointly organized by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions and the Centres for Medieval Studies, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies and Eighteenth Century Studies at the University of York. It invites papers that address the above issues from disciplines including, but not restricted to: history, religion, literature, art, music, politics, archaeology, philosophy and anthropology.

Papers and panels might focus on the following questions and themes:

  • Emotion and political and social action: How have emotions been used by various political, religious and other groups to reinforce or to undermine social and political hierarchies? What role did gender play in these processes?
  • Dynasty, rule and emotional display.
  • The affective dimensions of war, protest, revolution and nation building
  • Diplomacy and the negotiation of cross-cultural emotions
  • Religious change, power and emotions
  • How has the relationship between emotions / passions and power been understood and theorized across time?
  • The micro-politics of intimate relationships and gendered power
  • The role of ritual, object and liturgy in managing, intensifying, or disciplining political, religious or other emotions
  • What techniques and venues have been used to construct and amplify collective emotions? Papers might consider mass meetings, crowds, congregations, theatres, assemblies and clubs.

The organisers welcome proposals for individual 20-minute papers, for panels (which may adopt a more innovative format, including round-tables, a larger number of short presentations), or for postgraduate poster presentations.

Proposals should be sent to Pam Bond, Administrative Officer at the Centre for the History of Emotions, University of Western Australia. Email: emotions@uwa.edu.au by Friday 27 January 2017.

 

Decolonizing Theories of Emotions

Voici un numéro de la revue  indienne Samyukta, A Journal of Gender and Culture fort intéressant, paru cet été, pour celles et ceux qui souhaitent élargir leurs façons de penser l’émotion en allant voir ce qu’en pensent Indiens et indianistes, spécialistes de la culture

Le site est un peu instable, il faut cliquer 2 fois pour accéder au contenu…

Contents

Guest editorial by Sneja Gunew

Is there an Indian Way of Reading Emotions? Trs Sharma

Decolonizing Empathy: Thinking Affect Transnationally Carolyn Pedwell

Body-sense and the Somatic Markers: Emotions in Consciousness Sangeetha Menon

Flows of Feeling Vilashini Cooppan

What does Sanskrit Aesthetics Offer the Contemporary Novel? Nikhil Govind

Revolutionary Joy / Infectious Feeling Dina Al-Kassim

The Violence of Caste and Sexuality : P. Sivakami Kiran Keshavamurthy

The Scene of Humiliation V. Sanil

Extinction Affect and the Case of the Polar Bear Margery Fee

Expressing Body, Experience of Emotion B. Hariharan

Sahrudaya – A Resonant Heart J. Sreenivasha Murthy

Aesthetic Sensibility – An Indian Perspective V. S. Sharma

Presencing Emotions and Absenting Bodies ? A Glance Back Priya V.

 

 

Conférence : Between the Lines: Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts, Columbia University, NY, 29-30 September 2016

PROGRAM:

All conference events will take place in the Columbia University Faculty House Seminar Room 1 with the exception of Thursday night’s dinner, which will take place in the Faculty House dining room.  Any changes to the venue will be posted in the entry foyer of the Faculty House. For directions to Faculty House, see: http://facultyhouse.columbia.edu/files/facultyhouse/web/Faculty_House_Directions.pdf

THURSDAY, September 29th 2016:

Arrival, 3:00-3:15pm

Coffee and tea provided

Welcome, 3:15-3:30pm

Session #1: Teaching and Learning Emotion, 3:30-5:00pm

Irina Dumitrescu, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, moderator

“Embarrassment: Losing Face in Rhetorical School Texts of the Central Middle Ages”

Monika Otter, Dartmouth College

Swiðe swete to belcettan: Affective Eruptions in the Old English Boethius”

Jennifer A. Lorden, University of California, Berkeley

“Medieval Stupor”

Thomas Prendergast, College of Wooster

Coffee Break, 5:00-5:15pm

Keynote Lecture: « Making Up People Between the Lines, » 5:15-7:00pm

Fiona Somerset, University of Connecticut

Stephanie Trigg, University of Melbourne, introduction

FRIDAY, September 30th 2016

Arrival/Breakfast, 8:15-8:45am

Welcome, 8:45-9:00am

Session #2: Empathy and Compassion, 9:00-10:30am

Patricia Dailey, Columbia University, moderator

Car je n’ay plus sens ne memoire: Feeling Other People’s Demons in Medieval French Theater”

Andreea Marculescu, University of California, Irvine

“Emotional Contagion in the Middle Ages”

Beatrice Delaurenti, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociale

“Griselda’s Swoon: Historicizing Medieval Affect Alongside Emotion”

Glenn Burger, Queens College and CUNY Graduate Center

Coffee Break, 10:30-10:45am

Session #3: Images and Objects, 10:45am-12:15pm

Lauren Mancia, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, moderator

“Performing Emotion in the Sculpted Deposition”

Julia Perratore, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“Tears for Abraham? The Sacrifice of Isaac in Anglo-Saxon Imagination”

Shu-han Luo, Yale University

“Feeling in the Margins in Fifteenth-Century Prayer Books”

Sara M. Weisweaver, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Lunch, 12:15-1:30pm

Session #4: Affections in Community, 1:30-3:00pm

Piroska Nagy, Université du Québec à Montréal, moderator

“Private Emotions and Public Display: Normative Court Community in Castile-Leon, c. 1250-1350”

Kim Bergqvist, Stockholm University

“Can Emotions Make Law?: Collective Trauma, Apostasy and Legal Responsiveness in Fifteenth Century Austrian Jewry”

Tamar Menashe, Columbia University

“Jealousy (ghayra) in Pre-Modern Islamic Constructions of Masculinity”

Marion H. Katz, New York University

Break, 3:00-3:15pm

Session #5: Affective Genres, 3:15-4:45pm

Stephanie Trigg, University of Melbourne, moderator

“The Abstemious Affect of the Couplet Genre in Early Modern South Asian Devotional Poetry”

Manpreet Kaur, Columbia University

“Negative Interiority: Unruly Feelings in Premodern Korean Fiction”

Ksenia Chizhova, Princeton University

“Moving the Soul: Exegesis and Medieval Psychology in Simone Fidati’s De Gestis Domini Salvatoris »

Xavier Biron-Ouellet, Université du Québec à Montréal

Closing Discussion, 4:45-5:30pm

Jesus Rodriguez Velasco, Columbia University

 

Des émotions immorales, inconfortables et laides ?

The Danish historical journal temp is planning a special issue:

Uncomfortable, immoral, and ugly feelings
In recent decades the discipline of history has witnessed a tremendous increase the interest in emotions. Among other things, scholars have examined how cultures of emotions have emerged and changed. They have also looked at how historical actors have adopted and adapted the emotional repertoires that were socially acceptable in various historical contexts. In this temp issue we wish to explore a new and different strand within this field, that is, the affective moments and experiences that break with prevailing emotional norms. Through a focused attention on emotional disruptions as historical indicators of cultural shifts, we seek to shed light on the negative, morally reprehensible, uncomfortable or pathological feelings – as well as the titillating dangerous feelings.
Focusing on emotional practices deemed ignoble, raw, bad or ugly, essays will examine the historically variable relationship between morality, power, and affective practices. What role has feelings such as greed, envy, thirst for revenge, shame, apathy, or misplaced desire played in different contexts? How have historical actors handled unpleasant emotions? In what ways have negative feelings been used as a means of social regulation or contestation? When are feelings deemed inappropriate and how does that affect the social contexts within which they are practiced? How do “good” emotions turn “bad”?

We welcome contributions in English or Danish exploring any historical period and context.
Deadlines Deadline for Abstracts (min. ½ page): September 15th 2016
Article Deadline: September 15th 2017
Author Seminar: April 2017 (Deadline for Papers: One month before Author Seminar)
Please send contributions and possible questions to: temphist@hum.au.dk The special issue is edited by an editorial group chaired by Karen Vallgårda and Nils Arne Sørensen.

L’émergence des sciences médiévales des émotions aux XI-XIIIe siècles, ou EMMA à Genève

EMMA sera l’hôte du Séminaire des Archives Jean Piaget à Genève, mardi prochain le 26 avril, à 18h15, salle R040 à UniMail, à Genève.

Genève Piaget

L’émergence des sciences médiévales des émotions aux 11e-13e siècles: une histoire intellectuelle

Résumé de la conférence

Alors que d’après le récit, devenu habituel, du développement de la pensée occidentale à propos de l’émotion, le concept se cristallise parallèlement à la sécularisation de la société et de la pensée européenne et il est étroitement lié à la naissance de la discipline psychologique, on va tenter de montrer ici qu’une psychologie systématique de l’affectivité, dans laquelle émotion et raison sont étroitement liées, avait émergé bien plus tôt, dans le cadre de la pensée chrétienne occidentale. En effet l’anthropologie chrétienne – ie, la conception de l’être humain – est entièrement reformulée dans le contexte du renouveau culturel et intellectuel des XI-XIIIe siècles, à la fois dans le monde monastique et les milieux ‘scolastiques’. Au haut Moyen Âge les émotions étaient comprises dans la perspective morale dualiste des vices et des vertus; à partir du XIIe siècle, les émotions, positives ou négatives, attirent une attention croissante et commencent à faire partie de l’image plus complexe de la nature humaine. Alors même que la perspective chrétienne demeure le cadre d’une littérature en forte croissance, orientée vers la psychologie, les émotions sont décrites en rapport avec les puissances de l’âme et leurs dimensions sensorielles et corporelles, en même temps qu’avec leurs fonctions cognitive, rationnelle et volitive, considérées de manière intégrée. C’est cette psychologie médiévale des émotions que nous souhaitons ici présenter.

Appel à communication : Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts — New York, 3 septembre 2016

Call for Papers

 Between the Lines:

Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts

 Co-Sponsored by The Columbia University Seminar on Affect Studies

& the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE)

 Columbia University Faculty House

Friday, September 30, 2016

Keynote speaker:

Fiona Somerset, Professor, Department of English, University of Connecticut

 This conference addresses multiple challenges in the study of affect and emotion in the pre-modern period.  To what extent can we assume commensurability between contemporary definitions and understandings of affect or emotion and earlier, pre-modern iterations? Can we historicize affect? How do we? One strategy is to read across the surface in pre-modern works, looking for the explicit naming of emotional states (for example, “anger” or “joy”) and the gestures and expressions associated with those states; but another might be to read between the lines and find less discursively obvious articulations of affect or emotion. How, for example, do we discern or quantify affect in a culture that might value understatement and reserve? How do we read the absence, or indeed, the extremes of emotional expression or affect in texts? How do cultural texts (artistic, literary, religious etc.) contribute to the history of emotions? And how do we account for emotional change across time?

Papers for this conference should address these themes in pre-modern texts (pre-1500) from around the world.  “Texts” can be constructed loosely, as written, oral, aural, visual, literary, political, administrative, religious, etc.

Possible ideas include, but are not limited to:

  • evaluating the representations of emotions in the past via word study
  • understanding normative associations of emotions with genders, or with specific types figures (heroes, demons, etc.) and genres.
  • exploring how to discern emotional experience that is not categorized, or categorizable
  • recognizing mixed emotions
  • exploring the role of gestures, facial expressions, movements in art and literature
  • interpreting the absence of emotional expression or affect altogether
  • reading the filiation of certain emotions with the presence of faith/obedience, or with practices of conversion and devotion and the cultivation of community
  • tracing unstated, unnamed emotions
  • making associations between emotions and visual culture
  • aligning the modern or contemporary interest in emotions and affects with the pre-modern
  • interrogating the relation between emotions and conceptions of private and public life in the pre-modern
  • reading emotions in cross-cultural encounters
  • pedagogy and pre-modern affect

 

Submission deadline for abstracts: May 1, 2016. Abstracts of 300 words accompanied by a brief biographical paragraph should be submitted to conference organizers Patricia Dailey and Lauren Mancia (Columbia University Seminar on Affect Studies) and Stephanie Trigg (University of Melbourne/ARC CHE): premodern.affect@gmail.com. Papers should be up to 20 minutes in length.

Subventions for travel or lodging will be available to graduate students giving papers. To apply for a subvention, write an additional paragraph explaining how this paper and conference fit into your larger program of graduate study, what funds you already have access to, and what approximate costs you will have in traveling to and staying near Columbia for the conference. Submit this paragraph along with your abstract and biographical paragraph by May 1, 2016.