Archives de catégorie : Appels à contribution

Loi, science et émotions dans l’Europe moderne (appel à contributions)

Evidence of Feeling: Law, Science and Emotions in Modern Europe

 

Call for Papers

 

Date:  April 10, 2017 to April 11, 2017
Location:  Germany
Organizer: Daphne Rozenblatt
The power to prove or disprove a feeling is nowhere more strongly exhibited than in the courts of law, where emotions can determine the motives (and therefore culpability) of a defendant accused of a crime; affirm, discredit, or cast doubt upon the validity of a witness’s testimony; or determine the damages and compensation owed to the offended party. But what constitutes evidence of feeling? As a legal concept, evidence is both mutable and case specific. A court can reject and deny the admittance of evidence, can produce evidence through testimony and interrogation, and can rely upon extra-legal systems of knowledge, often times including scientific expertise. The challenges of legal evidence are further complicated by the emotions both implicit and explicit to juridical processes. Despite these ambiguities, emotions are often crucial to detecting and determining motive, intent, mens rea, etc. and affecting not only the verdict of a trial, but its broader social and political meaning.
This workshop aims to bring together research on the history of emotions in law and science in order to examine emotions together with the relationship between systems of knowledge and social practices in the scientific-legal setting. It builds on recent research on law and emotions that has examined both the way that emotions are addressed, arbitrated, defended, and prohibited by legal code as well as the emotional practices of various persons within the court, included judges, jurors, lawyers, and spectators. Furthermore, it builds on research into the history of science and the emotions, which has explored emotions as scientific objects and as part of scientific practice. By focusing on evidence as a crux between theory and practice, it not only aims to contribute to the legal and scientific history of emotions, but emotional epistemology through historical examine.
The workshop will be held on 10th and 11th April 2017 at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Travel and accomodation costs will be covered. The organizers welcome contributions with a strong historical impetus from all social and cultural sciences. Please send proposals (a short CV and sketch of max. 500 words) by 19th February 2017 to: cfp-emotions@mpib-berlin.mpg.de.
Contact Info: 
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Center for the History of Emotions
Daphne Rozenblatt
Lentzeallee 94
14195 Berlin
Germany
Contact Email:
URL:

CFP : Communities, Imaginations and Emotions in the Medieval Mediterranean

Source :  Universiteit Gent

Society for the Medieval Mediterranean – Conference 2017

The fifth biennial conference of the Society for the Medieval Mediterranean will take place at Ghent University from Monday 10th July to Wednesday 12th July 2017.

The theme of the conference is “Communities, Imaginations and Emotions in the Medieval Mediterranean”. We welcome papers from all disciplines that study emotions, imaginations and communities in, of and across the Medieval Mediterranean. This theme invites a variety of lines of inquiry, a number of which are suggested below. How were emotions produced, expressed and communicated? To what end were imaginations used and abused? In what ways were communities perceived and understood? What communalities and particularities are there? Which challenges do the literary, historical, archaeological and other sources pose in this respect?

The keynotes will be delivered by Professor Marina Rustow (Princeton) and Professor Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg).

Topics of the Conference

Topics of the conference include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Emotional and imagined communities
  • Selfing and othering
  • Identity and alterity, senses of belonging, ties that bond
  • Memory, nostalgia and the imagined or idealized past
  • Mirabilia, wonders and magic
  • Worldviews and other social schemata
  • Mobility across borders
  • Emotional and communal dimensions to identity
  • Honour and shame, social codes and values
  • Emotions bodily felt, orally expressed
  • Reading and sharing emotions
  • Methodological problems when inquiring emotions and imaginations

 

Call for papers and panels

We invite 200-300 word abstracts for individual 20-minute papers relating to the conference theme. Participants are encouraged to submit proposals for panels of 3 papers – in this case, the panel proposer should collate the three abstracts and submit them together, indicating clearly the rationale behind the planned panel. A pdf version of the call for papers and panels is accessible here.

 

First deadline:

Abstracts for individual papers and proposals for panels should be emailed to the conference email address (smm2017@ugent.be) by Monday 31st October 2016. Applicants will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper or panel by January 2017.

Des émotions immorales, inconfortables et laides ?

The Danish historical journal temp is planning a special issue:

Uncomfortable, immoral, and ugly feelings
In recent decades the discipline of history has witnessed a tremendous increase the interest in emotions. Among other things, scholars have examined how cultures of emotions have emerged and changed. They have also looked at how historical actors have adopted and adapted the emotional repertoires that were socially acceptable in various historical contexts. In this temp issue we wish to explore a new and different strand within this field, that is, the affective moments and experiences that break with prevailing emotional norms. Through a focused attention on emotional disruptions as historical indicators of cultural shifts, we seek to shed light on the negative, morally reprehensible, uncomfortable or pathological feelings – as well as the titillating dangerous feelings.
Focusing on emotional practices deemed ignoble, raw, bad or ugly, essays will examine the historically variable relationship between morality, power, and affective practices. What role has feelings such as greed, envy, thirst for revenge, shame, apathy, or misplaced desire played in different contexts? How have historical actors handled unpleasant emotions? In what ways have negative feelings been used as a means of social regulation or contestation? When are feelings deemed inappropriate and how does that affect the social contexts within which they are practiced? How do “good” emotions turn “bad”?

We welcome contributions in English or Danish exploring any historical period and context.
Deadlines Deadline for Abstracts (min. ½ page): September 15th 2016
Article Deadline: September 15th 2017
Author Seminar: April 2017 (Deadline for Papers: One month before Author Seminar)
Please send contributions and possible questions to: temphist@hum.au.dk The special issue is edited by an editorial group chaired by Karen Vallgårda and Nils Arne Sørensen.

Special Issue on ‘Emotion and Change’: Emotions: History, Culture, Society

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

EHCS invites scholars exploring the question ‘What differences do emotions make in processes of change?’ to propose articles for inclusion in a special issue on ‘Emotion and Change’, to be published in the first half of 2018. 

One of the key issues for scholars who study emotions is the role that they play in processes of social, cultural, historical, political, economic and other forms of change. Particularly relevant to such discussions have been studies of collective or mass emotions and their relationship to social or political movements; the uses of emotion to manipulate groups, such as through mass media, or the key role of affection in childhood development, that plays a significant role in adult life chances and outcomes. Teasing out the role emotion plays in such processes – is it an actor in its own right; a tool to be utilised; or something of both? – remains a significant area of debate in the field. More broadly, an interrogation of emotion can rethink what scholars should look for when assessing change. Is change something that happens at the level of individuals, groups or societies; is feeling enough to mark change or does it have to be followed by action, and if so what counts as action? If emotions are at stake in processes of change, how do they operate to enable change? How is emotion mediated, shared, transformed and put to work? What role do the arts, literature, technology and more play in such emotional processes of change?

The above questions and discussion are intended to stimulate ideas and generate discussion but should not be viewed as limiting. Contributions are welcome that seek to reimagine the terms of this question to further our understanding of the operation of emotion in human life.

Proposals are now invited for 6,000-8,000 word articles (including notes) that fall under this remit and should include a c.500 word abstract of the proposed submission, a short biography of the author and contact information. Please send proposals and enquiries to editemotions@gmail.com by 31 July 2016. More information will be available shortly on our website.

Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS) Journal

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

The Society for the History of Emotions, a project of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 1100-1800, is pleased to announce its new journal Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS). We anticipate that the first issue of the journal will be launched in 2017. The journal, in the first instance, will be published by the Centre for the History of Emotions.

EHCS is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal dedicated to understanding emotions as historically and culturally-situated phenomena and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience, societies, cultures and environments. The editors are now accepting submissions.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. We aim to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices. We are interested in multidisciplinary approaches (qualitative and quantitative) from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and related disciplines.

We also invite papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts; and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. EHCS also accepts reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

For more details or to submit a contribution, please email:
editemotions@gmail.com

Editors
Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide
Andrew Lynch, The University of Western Australia

CFP « Fear ». 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference (Los Angeles)

Source : Fabula

CALL FOR PAPERS

21st Annual Graduate Student Conference

Department of French & Francophone Studies

University of California, Los Angeles

20-21 October 2016

http://uclaffsconference2016.weebly.com/

Keynote Speaker: Tracy Sharpley-Whiting, Vanderbilt University

                                                        FEAR

Discourses of fear dominate our contemporary moment. In this so-called “Age of Terrorism,” fear knows no borders, spreads quickly, and provokes the fearful to react in unpredictable ways. Politicians lash out and make shows of strength; citizens march en masse while immigrant families take flight; journalists proclaim “même pas peur!” while young people turn to newer forms of media to express their disillusionment and reshape pervasive stereotypes. At the same time, the causes—or perceived causes—of fear can be as varied as these reactions. Though opinion polls might define fear in terms of “terrorism,” “immigration,” or “globalization,” these kinds of categories often obfuscate and conflate more than they clarify.

Using fear as a framework of analysis, we propose to explore how it permeates the discourses of literature, art, and history, in its overt and covert forms. In literature, for example, we tend to associate French medieval epics with the fear of losing territory and influence. How might fears regarding religious conversion undergird these stories? Turning to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, humanists of these epochs were motivated by an anxious desire to claim themselves as the inheritors of ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Could we argue that this ambition reflects an unstated fear of not measuring up to these models? France in the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was rocked by revolutions. How might material fears such as hunger have intertwined with ideological fears of persecution and repression to inspire social, political, and cultural change?

In the face of repressive regimes from Indochina to Vichy France, from Haiti to Cameroon, dissidents could face severe, or even lethal, punishment. How does the fear of denunciation give rise to coded writings that criticize and subvert the status quo?

In and beyond these contexts, how does fear cloud reason or induce clarity? Can it also have positive, not simply negative, effects? When is fear “natural” and when is it not? Who plays a role in shaping these perceptions? How and by whom is it incited and manipulated, diverted and channeled, coped with, suppressed and overcome? To what end?

For the 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference of the UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies, we seek to explore the reverberations of fear in French and Francophone literatures, languages, arts, cultures, and histories across time periods and disciplines. We understand fear to include empirical and conceptual engagements with the notions of terror, horror, panic, and phobia. We are interested in how these may be connected to creative endeavor, literary and artistic movements, political and economic gain, and aesthetic and cultural transformations. Our aim is to address concerns of importance to scholars in literature, history, film and media studies, art history, sociology, anthropology, gender studies, and philosophy.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

In what cases does fear underlie opinions, decisions, and reactions?

How is fear instrumentalized and exploited?

How does fear work covertly, surreptitiously, or secretly? How can it be disguised? In what ways does the need for aesthetic and social ideals of “purity” and “order” reflect underlying fears?

What causes fear to be politicized or depoliticized?

How does fear legitimate or justify? Unify or divide?

In what ways is fear an affective experience?

How does fear blend with other emotions and states, such as love, desire, obsession, and fascination?

When is fear unacknowledged or even suppressed?

In what ways does fear create confusion, incite hysteria, and/or suspend reason?

How does fear cause paralysis? Or can it provoke action?

How does fear limit expression? Conversely, how can it engender creative response?

When does fear lead to protection and security for some and an amplification of fear for others?

Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer) in English or French, along with your paper title, affiliation, contact information, and biography (75 words) to uclafrenchgradconf2016@gmail.com. Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes in length.

Our deadline for submissions is July 15, 2016.

Appel à communication : Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts — New York, 3 septembre 2016

Call for Papers

 Between the Lines:

Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts

 Co-Sponsored by The Columbia University Seminar on Affect Studies

& the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE)

 Columbia University Faculty House

Friday, September 30, 2016

Keynote speaker:

Fiona Somerset, Professor, Department of English, University of Connecticut

 This conference addresses multiple challenges in the study of affect and emotion in the pre-modern period.  To what extent can we assume commensurability between contemporary definitions and understandings of affect or emotion and earlier, pre-modern iterations? Can we historicize affect? How do we? One strategy is to read across the surface in pre-modern works, looking for the explicit naming of emotional states (for example, “anger” or “joy”) and the gestures and expressions associated with those states; but another might be to read between the lines and find less discursively obvious articulations of affect or emotion. How, for example, do we discern or quantify affect in a culture that might value understatement and reserve? How do we read the absence, or indeed, the extremes of emotional expression or affect in texts? How do cultural texts (artistic, literary, religious etc.) contribute to the history of emotions? And how do we account for emotional change across time?

Papers for this conference should address these themes in pre-modern texts (pre-1500) from around the world.  “Texts” can be constructed loosely, as written, oral, aural, visual, literary, political, administrative, religious, etc.

Possible ideas include, but are not limited to:

  • evaluating the representations of emotions in the past via word study
  • understanding normative associations of emotions with genders, or with specific types figures (heroes, demons, etc.) and genres.
  • exploring how to discern emotional experience that is not categorized, or categorizable
  • recognizing mixed emotions
  • exploring the role of gestures, facial expressions, movements in art and literature
  • interpreting the absence of emotional expression or affect altogether
  • reading the filiation of certain emotions with the presence of faith/obedience, or with practices of conversion and devotion and the cultivation of community
  • tracing unstated, unnamed emotions
  • making associations between emotions and visual culture
  • aligning the modern or contemporary interest in emotions and affects with the pre-modern
  • interrogating the relation between emotions and conceptions of private and public life in the pre-modern
  • reading emotions in cross-cultural encounters
  • pedagogy and pre-modern affect

 

Submission deadline for abstracts: May 1, 2016. Abstracts of 300 words accompanied by a brief biographical paragraph should be submitted to conference organizers Patricia Dailey and Lauren Mancia (Columbia University Seminar on Affect Studies) and Stephanie Trigg (University of Melbourne/ARC CHE): premodern.affect@gmail.com. Papers should be up to 20 minutes in length.

Subventions for travel or lodging will be available to graduate students giving papers. To apply for a subvention, write an additional paragraph explaining how this paper and conference fit into your larger program of graduate study, what funds you already have access to, and what approximate costs you will have in traveling to and staying near Columbia for the conference. Submit this paragraph along with your abstract and biographical paragraph by May 1, 2016.

 

CFP Entre le cœur et le diaphragme. (D)écrire les émotions dans la littérature narrative et scientifique du Moyen Age

Source : Fabula

Colloque international à l’Université catholique de Louvain (8-10 décembre 2016)

Entre le cœur et le diaphragme. (D)écrire les émotions dans la littérature narrative et scientifique du Moyen Âge 

 

La codification écrite des émotions a toujours reposé sur une sorte d’aporie qui, de nos jours, est loin d’être résolue, même si la technologie numérique semble avoir trouvé une ‘solution’ dans les emoji ou emotikons (selon qu’on choisisse l’étymologie japonaise ou grecque). En 2015, l’Oxford Dictionnary a decerné le titre de « Word of the year » au ‘petit visage avec larmes de joie’ (Face with Tears of Joy emoji : ). Au-delà de l’anecdote, la pratique qui nous pousse à utiliser un double système, voire un code sémiotique hybride, confirme qu’il existe un hiatus entre la parole écrite et les réactions, sentiments, émotions qu’elle est censée refléter ou décrire.

L’histoire des émotions a connu un essor très important dans les dernières années comme en témoignent les nombreuses publications récentes ainsi que les projets de recherche en cours dans différentes universités d’Europe et des Etats-Unis – publications et projets embrassant l’histoire, la linguistique, l’anthropologie, la littérature. L’année 2015 a vu la publication de quatre importants ouvrages consacrés à l’histoire et l’écriture des émotions dans la tradition médiévale, notamment les volumes collectifs Emotions in Medieval Arthurian Literature et La expresión de las emociones en la lírica románica medieval, ainsi que les monographies Sensible Moyen Âge. Une histoire des émotions dans l’Occident médiéval et Fisiologia della passione. Poesia d’amore e medicina da Cavalcanti a Boccaccio.

Notre colloque a l’ambition de contribuer à la réflexion en lançant le pari de croiser les approches de l’écriture scientifique et de l’écriture narrative autour de cette grande problématique. Nous sommes surtout intéressés de comprendre dans quelle mesure la littérature médicale et la littérature narrative ont pu avoir des influences réciproques dans le traitement, la description, voire l’analyse des émotions.

Voici quelques possibles pistes de recherche :

  • Les notions de mélancolie, ire, colère etc. entre tradition romanesque / allégorique et théorie des quatre humeurs
  • Les auteurs qui se situent au carrefour entre écriture narrative et écriture scientifique, comme Evrart de Conty, Matfre Ermengaud, Dante Alighieri et bien d’autres, jusqu’à l’aube de la Renaissance.
  • Les traductions qui contribuent à enrichir le vocabulaire – de l’arabe ou du grec vers le latin et ensuite vers les langues vernaculaires – et à diffuser un savoir qui sera différemment assimilé par les écrivains, d’où la place que nous accordons au mot « diaphragme » dans notre intitulé (emprunté au grec par l’intermédiaire du latin, il est attesté pour la première fois dans le Commencement de la sapience des signes, traité didactique du juif andalou Abraham ibn Ezra, traduit en 1273 ou 1274 par Hagin le Juif ; ensuite dans la traduction de la Chirurgia d’Henri de Mondeville. D’après le Speculum naturale, XXVIII, 6, qui reprend le Pantegni traduit en latin par Constantin l’Africain, le diaphragme fait partie, comme le cœur, des membra spiritalia et joue un rôle déterminant dans la gestion de la chaleur naturelle du corps).

Les communications pourront embrasser à la fois les langues romanes, le latin et la tradition gréco-arabe. L’un des principaux objectifs de cette rencontre est de stimuler le dialogue entre les romanistes et les spécialistes de l’histoire des sciences, notamment de la médicine.

 

Les communications auront une durée d’environ 20-30 minutes.

Les propositions de communication, contenant le nom et l’affiliation institutionnelle du conférencier, accompagnées d’un résumé d’une dizaine de lignes, sont à envoyer à Grégory Clesse (gregory.clesse@uclouvain.be) avant le 15 avril 2016

 

 

Religious Materiality and Emotion (CFP)

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

Date: 17-18 February 2016, commencing with a public lecture on 16 February
Venue: Hosted by the Centre for the History of Emotions, The University of Adelaide at the Majestic Roof Garden Hotel, Adelaide City
Symposium organisers and enquiries: Dr Claire Walker, The University of Adelaide and Julie Hotchin, Australian National University.

Download Flyer


Key Speakers:

Professor Monique Scheer, University of Tübingen
Professor Miri Rubin, Queen Mary University of London
Charles Zika, The University of Melbourne.

Symposium

Abstract

Materiality plays a vital role in cultivating, shaping and directing religious emotions. Pilgrimage and public ritual, private devotional practices, the use of space and settings in which religious activities take place, and bodily posture and movement all arouse, shape and direct religious feelings. The recent critical interest in the role of material culture in religion has been paralleled by the attention in emotions studies to the exploration of affective relationships between beings and things, and the role of the material in eliciting emotional responses. Yet the interplay between materiality and emotions in religion has received less attention, especially within an historical context.

This symposium will integrate these strands of research by exploring the ways in which the material – such as objects, space, the body and sensory perception – stimulated, shaped and informed the emotional dimensions of religion.

Proposals

We invite abstracts for papers (20 minutes in length) that address the relationship between religion, materiality and emotion within a European context between 1200 and the present day. Papers that address the symposium theme from non-Christian traditions would be particularly welcome. Within the broader conference theme potential and welcome areas of inquiry may be, but are not limited to:

  • how religious imagery conveyed emotional messages and desired emotional dispositions
  • how objects, embodied practices and space were used to convey, amplify, transmit or diminish emotions within religious settings
  • the role of the material in generating religious identities and emotional communities
  • the dynamics between the material and emotions in encounters between adherents to different religions, religious conflicts or conversion
  • exploring relationships between particular objects or practices, and individual and collective religious emotions
  • how assumptions of gender inform interactions with religious objects and shape devotional practices and the emotions they arouse
  • the interplay between the material and emotions in power relations
  • the appropriation of religious imagery or objects by political regimes to mobilise and direct specific emotions
  • the role of the senses of cultivating religious feelings. Which senses were privileged and which diminished, and how did this affect the nature of emotional experience?
  • the emotions associated with the rejection of the material through renunciation or asceticism.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words, and a short biography, should be emailed to both Julie Hotchin, and Claire Walker by the deadline of the 31 October 2015. Questions or queries can also be addressed to the above.

Important

dates

Call for Papers: 31 October 2015
Notification of Acceptance: 15 November 2015

The symposium will start on the eve of Tuesday 16 February with a Public Lecture, and will run on Wednesday 17 and Thursday 18 February 2016.

Cost

information

A registration fee of AU$100 will include a conference pack, lunch, and morning and afternoon tea on 17 and 18 February. Postgraduate students will receive a discounted rate. There will also be a symposium dinner on 17 February. Details of the venue and cost of the dinner will be provided closer to the event.

Emotions: Movement, Cultural Contact and Exchange, 1100-1800 (CFP)

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

Date: 30 June to 2 July 2016
Venue: Freie Universität Berlin

Speakers

Professor Lyndal Roper, Regius Professor of History University of Oxford

Professor Monique Scheer, Historical and Cultural Anthropology, University of Tübingen

Professor Laura M. Stevens, Department of English, University of Tulsa

Conference

Committee

  • Professor Daniela Hacke (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Professor Claudia Jarzebowski (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Professor Andrew Lynch (University of Western Australia)
  • Associate Professor Jacqueline Van Gent (University of Western Australia)
  • Professor Charles Zika (University of Melbourne)

Emotions: Movement, Cultural Contact and Exchange, 1100-1800 is an international conference jointly sponsored by the Freie Universität Berlin and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, Europe 1100-1800, with the further involvement of scholars from The Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin. It will draw on a broad range of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary expertise in addressing the history of emotions in relation to cross-cultural movement, exchange, contact and changing connections in the later medieval and early modern periods. The conference thus brings together two major areas in contemporary Humanities: the study of how emotions were understood, expressed and performed in pre-modern contexts, both by individuals and within larger groups and communities; and the study of pre-modern cultural movements, contacts, exchanges and understandings, within Europe and between non-Europeans and Europeans.

The period 1100-1800 saw a vast expansion of cultural movement through travel and exploration, migration, mercantile and missionary activity, and colonial ventures. On pilgrimage routes to slave routes, European culture was on the move and opened up to incomers, bringing people, goods and aesthetic objects from different backgrounds into close contact, often for the first time. Individuals and societies had unprecedented opportunities for new forms of cultural encounter and conflict. One major question for the conference to consider is finding the appropriate theory and methodology that will account for the place of emotions in this varied history.

Such cross-cultural encounters took place within a context of beliefs – popular, religious and scientific – that were propagated in literary, historiographical and visual sources, with a heritage reaching back to the classical period, and with a long religious tradition. One strand of the conference will deal with the changing literary and visual cultures that mediated European understandings of African, Mediterranean and Asian peoples, practices and environments, and which reveal the image of Europe and Europeans in other regions. Literary works (travel narratives, histories, epics and romances, hagiography), theatrical performances, visual artefacts and musical compositions were highly important in forming the emotional character of cross-cultural contacts, and the nature of literary, visual and performance culture. They responded to new cultural influences and created the emotional habits and practices through which cultural understandings were received and interpreted.

The conference will also explore the role emotions played in shaping early modern and late colonial encounters between indigenous peoples and Europeans. This might include the emotions embedded in missionary work and conversion, as viewed from both sides of these transactions, and in European settlements built on slavery. Evidence is provided by the accounts of participants, in the records of European and colonial government sponsoring and regulating their populations, in personal correspondence, and also in the associated visual and material record, including maps and ethnographic illustrations, propaganda and other responses by indigenous subjects.

Tracing emotional cultural movements also invites consideration of the variety of spaces – ships, villages, churches, courts, rituals and dreams – in which cultural movements and contacts occurred, and emotive responses to environmental features. This might also include the emotional responses of non-Europeans who found themselves in European environments.

More generally, the conference will consider the affective strategies of early modern Europeans in the acquisition, exchange and display of colonial objects. What emotional transformations did objects undergo in their passage across Europe and between European and other societies? What was the role of emotions in the formation of early ethnographic texts and collections, and in the museum culture of early modern Europe?

This last question leads to the issue of retrospective emotions, as observers in modernity look back on the long history of cross-cultural contact and write its course. How have their desires and emotional projections influenced understanding and reception?

Emotions: Movement, Cultural Contact and Exchange, 1100-1800 will extend over two-and-a-half days, including three plenary sessions by distinguished invited speakers, several Round Table discussion groups, and numerous panels consisting of three 20 minute papers plus discussion. One or more refereed publications of essays based on proceedings are expected.

Paper

proposals

For individual paper proposals, individuals should submit a paper title, abstract (c. 250 words), your name, brief biography (no more than 100 words), institutional affiliation and status and contact details. For panel proposals, the organiser of the panel should submit the same information for each of the three speakers, and the name of the person to chair the panel. Please send the proposals to Ms Francisca Hoyer (FU Berlin) and Ms Pam Bond (CHE) by 31 October, 2015.

Emotional and Affective Narratives in pre-Modern Europe/ Late-Medieval and Renaissance France

Source : fabula

CfP Emotional and Affective Narratives in pre-Modern Europe/ Late-Medieval and Renaissance France

In contemporary thought, the field of emotion studies represents a very potent framework that allows anthropologists, historians, neuroscientists and philosophers to think of the possible ways in which subjects engage with their own sensory experience and with larger practices that enable them to articulate such experiences in in meaningful ways. Nevertheless, « How do I feel? » is a question that was equally quintessential in the pre-modern Western system of thought even if the contemporary significations of the word « emotion  » did not become concrete until the 17th century. In their attempt to capture pre-modern emotional modes and systems of feelings, contemporary medievalists, especially under the influence of poststructuralism, considered emotions primarily as discursive entities that shape collective and individual subjectivities.

Barbara Rosenwein’s influential notion of « emotional communities,” which inaugurates this trajectory in medieval studies, turns away from the Cartesian split between mind and body and, instead, presents emotions as discursive regimes consisting of strategies, tactics and the conscious ways in which subjects engage with these. However, while emotions are indeed discursive cultural constructs producing collective subjectivities they also possess a sensorial aspect that simultaneously escapes being captured by the social while being constitutive of it. This was the special contribution of the affective “turn” in contemporary theory: the epistemological need to distinguish between emotions as discursive constructs, and affects as flashes of sensory experience and feelings.

This volume aims at complicating Rosenwein’s existing notion of emotion as discursive practice and, at the same time, investigating how medieval subjects talked about their somatic, sensorial and affective practices. If emotions belong to the complexities of social dynamics, we ask how are they incorporated in textual artifacts and cultural productions stemming from often conflicting social events, groups and discourses? How do they act as facilitators between the author and its audience, between the period and its meaning, between the genre and its writing? The emotional and affective dimension of a text cannot be rationalized as either its objective or its point of origin. It is more a textual and factual paradigm around which the author develops her intellectual environment, creating the cultural and political dimension for the text. However, it is within this territory of the text, as a socio-cultural entity orchestrated by the auctorial persona, that a whole archive of emotions and affects is disseminated.

We are interested in essays that investigate the constituency of such “archives of feelings” (Cvetkovich) through the study of the affectivity and emotionality of both literary and non-literary texts, such as political and theological treatises, mystical texts, medical works, scientific tracts and pamphlets, hagiographies and encyclopedic compendiums. While we welcome submissions of articles dealing with such topics in different geographic areas, we are particularly interested in late-medieval and Renaissance French texts.

Articles may examine, but are not limited to questions related to:
– Discourses and practices of emotions and affect
– Somatization of the emotional act
– Affect and emotions in poetry
– Emotions, affect and gender
– Queer emotions and affects
– Emotions, affect and race
– Psychogeographies of emotions and affect
– Rhetorics of affect or emotions
– Emotional rewritings of historical events

Please send 300-word abstracts in English, as well as a short biography with university affiliation and email address, to Andreea Marculescu (marculescu.andreea@gmail.com or amarcule@uci.edu) and Charles-Louis Morand Métivier (cmorandm@uvm.edu) before June 1st. Selected abstracts will be notified on July 1st, and the complete papers will be due on November 1st.