The Reeducation of Emotions in Ancient Christianity

McGill University

The Faculty of Arts

School of Religious Studies

Public Lecture by

Professor Georgia Frank

Colgate University, Hamilton, New York

Onthetopic:

« The Reeducation of Emotions in Ancient Christianity »

TUESDAY, November 16, 2016

4:00pm-5:30pm

BirksBuilding,3520University

Room100

All are welcome

In conjunction with the Faculty of Arts Search for the Director of the School of Religious Studies

The Ancient Emotion of Disgust

9780190604110

Source : OUP

The Ancient Emotion of Disgust, Oxford university Press, 2016

Donald Lateiner and Dimos Spatharas (ed.)

The study of emotions and emotional displays has achieved a deserved prominence in recent classical scholarship. The emotions of the classical world can be plumbed to provide a valuable heuristic tool. Emotions can help us understand key issues of ancient ethics, ideological assumptions, and normative behaviors, but, more frequently than not, classical scholars have turned their attention to « social emotions » requiring practical decisions and ethical judgments in public and private gatherings. The emotion of disgust has been unwarrantedly neglected, even though it figures saliently in many literary genres, such as iambic poetry and comedy, historiography, and even tragedy and philosophy.
This collection of seventeen essays by fifteen authors features the emotion of disgust as one cutting edge of the study of Greek and Roman antiquity. Individual contributions explore a wide range of topics. These include the semantics of the emotion both in Greek and Latin literature, its social uses as a means of marginalizing individuals or groups of individuals, such as politicians judged deviant or witches, its role in determining aesthetic judgments, and its potentialities as an elicitor of aesthetic pleasure. The papers also discuss the vocabulary and uses of disgust in life (Galli, actors, witches, homosexuals) and in many literary genres: ancient theater, oratory, satire, poetry, medicine, historiography, Hellenistic didactic and fable, and the Roman novel. The Introduction addresses key methodological issues concerning the nature of the emotion, its cognitive structure, and modern approaches to it. It also outlines the differences between ancient and modern disgust and emphasizes the appropriateness of « projective or second-level disgust » (vilification) as a means of marginalizing unwanted types of behavior and stigmatizing morally condemnable categories of individuals. The volume is addressed first to scholars who work in the field of classics, but, since texts involving disgust also exhibit significant cultural variation, the essays will attract the attention of scholars who work in a wide spectrum of disciplines, including history, social psychology, philosophy, anthropology, comparative literature, and cross-cultural studies.

Preface
Introductory: Theory and Practice of an Ambivalent Emotion
Donald Lateiner (Ohio Wesleyan University)
Dimos Spatharas (University of Crete)
1. Empathy and the Limits of Disgust in the Hippocratic Corpus
George Kazantzidis (University of Patras/Open University of Cyprus)
2. Moral Disgust in Sophocles’ Philoctetes
Emily Allen-Hornblower (Rutgers University)
3. Disgust and Delight: The Polysemous Exclamation Aiboi in Attic Comedy
Daniel Levine (University of Arkansas)
4. Demosthenes and the use of disgust
Nick Fisher (Cardiff University)
5. Sex, politics and disgust in Aeschines’ Against Timarchus
Dimos Spatharas (University of Crete)
6. Beauty in suffering: disgust in Nicander’s Theriaca
Floris Overduin (Radboud University)
7. Not Tonight, Dear-I’m Feeling a Little /pig/
Robert Kaster (Princeton University)
8. Beyond Disgust: The Politics of Fastidium in Livy’s AUC
Alison Haimson-Lushkov (University of Texas at Austin)
9. Witches, Disgust, and Anti-abortion Propaganda in Imperial Rome
Debbie Felton (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
10. Evoking Disgust in the Latin Novels of Petronius and Apuleius
Donald Lateiner (Ohio Wesleyan University)
11. Obscena Galli praesentia: Dehumanizing Cybele’s Eunuch Priests through Disgust
Marika Rauhala (University of Oulu)
12. Monstrum in fronte, monstrum in animo?: Sublate disgust and pharmakos logic in the Aesopic vitae
Tom Hawkins (The Ohio State University)
13. Smelly bodies on stage: disgusting actors of the Roman imperial period
Mali Skotheim (Princeton University)
Bibliography
Index Rerum
Index Auctorum Antiquorum et locorum

Generazioni di sentimenti Una storia delle emozioni, 600-1700

936119ded9e9babf463ffa16051cbc03_w600_h_mw_mh_cs_cx_cy

Source : Viella

Generazioni di sentimenti. Una storia delle emozioni, 600-1700, Viella, 2016

Barbara H. Rosenwein

Traduzione e cura di Riccardo Cristiani

Collana: La storia. Temi, 51

Generazioni di sentimenti è il primo libro in Italia a offrire tutta la novità degli studi recenti di storia delle emozioni, uno dei più interessanti e nuovi filoni della ricerca storica internazionale. Barbara Rosenwein esplora varietà, trasformazioni e costanti dei sentimenti espressi da numerose comunità emotive nell’arco di undici secoli di storia europea, dal medioevo alla prima età moderna. I capitoli si concentrano in particolare su Francia e Inghilterra e toccano comunità disparate – quelle del monastero inglese di Rievaulx (XII sec.) e della corte ducale di Borgogna (XV sec.), ad esempio – valutando i modi in cui le norme emotive e le forme espressive rispondono agli ambienti sociali, religiosi e culturali, e come a loro volta creano quegli ambienti. Unendo le emozioni sperimentate “sul campo” a quelle teorizzate nei trattati di Alcuino, Tommaso d’Aquino, Jean Gerson e Thomas Hobbes, questo studio mette finalmente a disposizione un racconto nuovo e profondo della vita emotiva occidentale.

  • Premessa all’edizione italiana
  • Nota del traduttore
  • Abbreviazioni e sigle
  • Introduzione
  • 1. Le teorie antiche
  • 2. Calorosità e freddezza
  • 3. La terapia di Alcuino
  • 4. Amore e tradimento
  • 5. Tommaso e le passioni
  • 6. Teatralità e sobrietà
  • 7. La musica di Gerson
  • 8. Disperazione e felicità
  • 9. Hobbes e i movimenti
  • Conclusioni
  • Fonti e bibliografia
  • Elenco delle figure
  • Indice dei nomi, dei luoghi e delle parole di emozioni

Barbara H. Rosenwein è docente emerita della Loyola University di Chicago. Si è occupata di monachesimo cluniacense, di immunità monastiche e di esenzioni vescovili. È l’autrice di un manuale di storia medievale per le università americane – A Short History of the Middle Ages – ormai alla sua quarta edizione. Dalla fine degli anni Novanta dedica le sue ricerche alla storia delle emozioni e nel 2006 è uscito il suo Emotional Communities in the Early Middle Ages.

Disaster, Death and the Emotions in the Shadow of the Apocalypse, 1400–1700

9781137442703

Source : Palgrave

Disaster, Death and the Emotions in the Shadow of the Apocalypse, 1400–1700, Palgrave, 2016

Editors: Spinks, Jennifer, Zika, Charles (Eds.)

In late medieval and early modern Europe, textual and visual records of disaster and mass death allow us to encounter the intense emotions generated through the religious, providential and apocalyptic frameworks that provided these events with meaning. This collection brings together historians, art historians, and literary specialists in a cross-disciplinary collection shaped by new developments in the history of emotions. It offers a rich range of analytical frameworks and case studies, from the emotional language of divine providence to individual and communal experiences of disaster. Geographically wide-ranging, the collection also analyses many different sorts of media: from letters and diaries to broadsheets and paintings. Through these and other historical records, the contributors examine how communities and individuals experienced, responded to, recorded and managed the emotional dynamics and trauma created by dramatic events like massacres, floods, fires, earthquakes and plagues.

Engaging the Emotions in Spanish Culture and History

lgcover-9780826520852

Source : Vanderbilt University Press

Engaging the Emotions in Spanish Culture and History, Vanderbilt University Press, 2016

Editor(s): Luisa Elena Delgado, Pura Fernandez, Jo Labanyi

Rather than being properties of the individual self, emotions are socially produced and deployed in specific cultural contexts, as this collection documents with unusual richness. All the essays show emotions to be a form of thought and knowledge, and a major component of social life—including in the nineteenth century, which attempted to relegate them to a feminine intimate sphere.

The collection ranges across topics such as eighteenth-century sensibility, nineteenth-century concerns with the transmission of emotions, early twentieth-century cinematic affect, and the contemporary mobilization of political emotions including those regarding nonstate national identities. The complexities and effects of emotions are explored in a variety of forms—political rhetoric, literature, personal letters, medical writing, cinema, graphic art, soap opera, journalism, popular music, digital media—with attention paid to broader European and transatlantic implications.


Biography of Editor(s)

Luisa Elena Delgado is Professor of Spanish, Critical Theory, and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Pura Fernández is Research Professor in the Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences at Spain’s National Research Council.
Jo Labanyi is Professor of Spanish at New York University.

Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions

9780199981892

Source : OUP

Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions, Oxford University Press, 2015

Catherine Keane

In his sixteen verse Satires, Juvenal explores the emotional provocations and pleasures associated with social criticism and mockery. He makes use of traditional generic elements such as the first-person speaker, moral diatribe, narrative, and literary allusion to create this new satiric preoccupation and theme. Juvenal defines the satirist figure as an emotional agent who dramatizes his own response to human vices and faults, and he in turn aims to engage other people’s feelings. Over the course of his career, he adopts a series of rhetorical personae that represent a spectrum of satiric emotions, encouraging his audience to ponder satire’s proper emotional mode and function. Juvenal first offers his signature indignatio with its associated pleasures and discomforts, then tries on subtler personae that suggest dry detachment, callous amusement, anxiety, and other affective states.

As Keane shows, the satiric emotions are not only found in the author’s rhetorical performances, but they are also a major part of the human farrago that the Satires purport to treat. Juvenal’s poems explore the dynamic operation of emotions in society, drawing on diverse ancient literary, rhetorical, and philosophical sources. Each poem uniquely engages with different texts and ideas to reveal the unsettling powers of its emotional mode. Keane also analyzes the « emotional plot » of each book of Satires and the structural logic of the entire series with its wide range of subjects and settings. From his famous angry tirades to his more puzzling later meditations, Juvenal demonstrates an enduring interest in the relationship between feelings and moral judgment.

Contents
Acknowledgments
Note on Texts and Translations
Introduction
Chapter 1: Anger Games
Chapter 2: Monstrous Misogyny and the End of Anger
Chapter 3: Change, Decline, and the Progress of Satire
Chapter 4: Considering Tranquility
Chapter 5: The Praegrandis Senex
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

Catherine Keane is Associate Professor of Classics at Washington University in St. Louis. She is the author of Figuring Genre in Roman Satire (2006) and A Roman Verse Satire Reader (2010).

Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World

9780190278298

Source : OUP

Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World, Oxford Univesity Press, 2016

Edited by Ruth R. Caston and Robert A. Kaster

The emotions have long been an interest for those studying ancient Greece and Rome. But while the last few decades have produced excellent studies of individual emotions and the different approaches to them by the major philosophical schools, the focus has been almost entirely on negative emotions. This might give the impression that the Greeks and Romans had little to say about positive emotion, something that would be misguided. As the chapters in this collection indicate, there are representations of positive emotions extending from archaic Greek poetry to Augustine, and in both philosophical works and literary genres as wide-ranging as lyric poetry, forensic oratory, comedy, didactic poetry, and the novel. Nor is the evidence uniform: while many of the literary representations give expression to positive emotion but also describe its loss, the philosophers offer a more optimistic assessment of the possibilities of attaining joy or contentment in this life.

The positive emotions show some of the same features that all emotions do. But unlike the negative emotions, which we are able to describe and analyze in great detail because of our preoccupation with them, positive emotions tend to be harder to articulate. Hence the interest of the present study, which considers how positive emotions are described, their relationship to other emotions, the ways in which they are provoked or upset by circumstances, how they complicate and enrich our relationships with other people, and which kinds of positive emotion we should seek to integrate. The ancient works have a great deal to say about all of these topics, and for that reason deserve more study, both for our understanding of antiquity and for our understanding of the positive emotions in general.

Contents
Introduction Ruth R. Caston and Robert A. Kaster
I. Hope
1. Douglas Cairns, Metaphors for Hope in Archaic and Classical Greek Poetry
2. Damien Nelis, Emotion in Vergil’s Georgics: Farming and the Politics of Hope
3. Laurel Fulkerson, ‘Torn between Hope and Despair’: Narrative Foreshadowing and Suspense in the Greek Novel
II. Joy and Happiness
4. Ruth R. Caston, The Irrepressibility of Joy in Roman Comedy
5. Michael C. J. Putnam, Horatius Felix
6. Margaret Graver, Anatomies of Joy: Seneca and the Gaudium Tradition
7. Christopher Gill, Positive Emotions in Stoicism: Are they Enough?
III. Fellow-feeling and Kindness
8. Ed Sanders, Generating Goodwill and Friendliness in Attic Forensic Oratory
9. David Armstrong, Utility and Affection in Epicurean Friendship: Philodemus On the Gods 3, On Property Management, and Horace, Sermones 2.6
10. Gillian Clark, Caritas: Augustine on Love and Fellow-feeling
11. Martha Nussbaum, ‘If You Could See This Heart’: Mozart’s Mercy
Works Cited

Edited by Ruth R. Caston, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, University of Michigan, and Robert A. Kaster, Kennedy Foundation Professor of Latin Language and Literature and Professor of Classics, Princeton University

Ruth R. Caston is an Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan and the author of Elegiac Passion: Jealousy in Roman Love Elegy.

Robert A. Kaster is the Kennedy Foundation Professor of Latin Language and Literature and Professor of Classics at Princeton University.

Gender, Material Culture and Emotions in Scandinavian History

Toivo, M. R. and J. Van Gent, eds. ‘Gender, Material Culture and Emotions in Scandinavian History’. Special Issue, Scandinavian Journal of History 41.3 (2016).

Summary :

Gender, Material Culture and Emotions in Scandinavian History
Introduction
Jacqueline Van Gent & Raisa Maria Toivo
Pages: 263-270

Materiality, rhetoric and emotion in the Pietà
Ann-Catrine Eriksson
Pages: 271-288
Religion and emotion
Raisa Maria Toivo
Pages: 289-305
Embroidering women and turning men
Johanna Ilmakunnas
Pages: 306-331
Negotiating charity
Åsa Karlsson Sjögren
Pages: 332-349
Mixed feelings
Eirinn Larsen & Vibeke Kieding Banik
Pages: 350-368
Emotional causality in dynamistic Finnish–Karelian folk belief
Laura Stark
Pages: 369-387
Linnaeus’ tea cup
Jacqueline Van Gent
Pages: 388-409
The botany of friendship and love
Ina Lindblom
Pages: 410-426
Books, dress, and emotions in the memoirs of the clergyman Johan Frosterus (1720–1809)
Päivi Räisänen-Schröder
Pages: 427-446
Face-making
Susan Broomhall
Pages: 447-474

Emotion and Persuasion in Classical Antiquity

source : 435e5699ccFranz Steiner Verlag

Ed Sanders (dir), Matthew Johncock (dir.), Emotion and Persuasion  in Classical Antiquity, Stuttgart, Franz Steiner Verlag, 2016.
321 p., 12 b/w tables.
ISBN 978-3-515-11361-8

Contributeurs
Ed Sanders, Chris Carey,
Brenda Griffith-Williams, Guy
Westwood, Angelos Chaniotis,
Maria Fragoulaki, Jayne Knight,
Alexandra Eckert, Lucy Jackson,
Jennifer Winter, Judith Hagen,
Matthew Johncock, Irene Salvo,
Eleanor Dickey, Kate Hammond,
Federica Iurescia

Appeal to emotion is a key technique of persuasion, ranked by Aristotle alongside logical reasoning and arguments from character. Although ancient philosophical discussions of it have been much researched, exploration of its practical use has focused largely on explicit appeals to a handful of emotions (anger, hatred, envy, pity) in 5th–4th century BCE Athenian courtroom oratory. This volume expands horizons: from an opening section focusing on so-far underexplored emotions and sub-genres of oratory in Classical Athens, its scope moves outwards generically, geographically, and chronologically through the « Greek East » to Rome.Key thematic links are: the role of emotion in the formation of community identity; persuasive strategies in situations of unequal power; and linguistic formulae and genre-specific emotional persuasion. Other recurring themes include performance (rather than arousal) of emotions, the choice between emotional and rational argumentation, the emotions of gods, and a concern with a secondary « audience »: the reader.

Decolonizing Theories of Emotions

Voici un numéro de la revue  indienne Samyukta, A Journal of Gender and Culture fort intéressant, paru cet été, pour celles et ceux qui souhaitent élargir leurs façons de penser l’émotion en allant voir ce qu’en pensent Indiens et indianistes, spécialistes de la culture

Le site est un peu instable, il faut cliquer 2 fois pour accéder au contenu…

Contents

Guest editorial by Sneja Gunew

Is there an Indian Way of Reading Emotions? Trs Sharma

Decolonizing Empathy: Thinking Affect Transnationally Carolyn Pedwell

Body-sense and the Somatic Markers: Emotions in Consciousness Sangeetha Menon

Flows of Feeling Vilashini Cooppan

What does Sanskrit Aesthetics Offer the Contemporary Novel? Nikhil Govind

Revolutionary Joy / Infectious Feeling Dina Al-Kassim

The Violence of Caste and Sexuality : P. Sivakami Kiran Keshavamurthy

The Scene of Humiliation V. Sanil

Extinction Affect and the Case of the Polar Bear Margery Fee

Expressing Body, Experience of Emotion B. Hariharan

Sahrudaya – A Resonant Heart J. Sreenivasha Murthy

Aesthetic Sensibility – An Indian Perspective V. S. Sharma

Presencing Emotions and Absenting Bodies ? A Glance Back Priya V.