Special Issue on ‘Emotion and Change’: Emotions: History, Culture, Society

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

EHCS invites scholars exploring the question ‘What differences do emotions make in processes of change?’ to propose articles for inclusion in a special issue on ‘Emotion and Change’, to be published in the first half of 2018. 

One of the key issues for scholars who study emotions is the role that they play in processes of social, cultural, historical, political, economic and other forms of change. Particularly relevant to such discussions have been studies of collective or mass emotions and their relationship to social or political movements; the uses of emotion to manipulate groups, such as through mass media, or the key role of affection in childhood development, that plays a significant role in adult life chances and outcomes. Teasing out the role emotion plays in such processes – is it an actor in its own right; a tool to be utilised; or something of both? – remains a significant area of debate in the field. More broadly, an interrogation of emotion can rethink what scholars should look for when assessing change. Is change something that happens at the level of individuals, groups or societies; is feeling enough to mark change or does it have to be followed by action, and if so what counts as action? If emotions are at stake in processes of change, how do they operate to enable change? How is emotion mediated, shared, transformed and put to work? What role do the arts, literature, technology and more play in such emotional processes of change?

The above questions and discussion are intended to stimulate ideas and generate discussion but should not be viewed as limiting. Contributions are welcome that seek to reimagine the terms of this question to further our understanding of the operation of emotion in human life.

Proposals are now invited for 6,000-8,000 word articles (including notes) that fall under this remit and should include a c.500 word abstract of the proposed submission, a short biography of the author and contact information. Please send proposals and enquiries to editemotions@gmail.com by 31 July 2016. More information will be available shortly on our website.

Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS) Journal

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

The Society for the History of Emotions, a project of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 1100-1800, is pleased to announce its new journal Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS). We anticipate that the first issue of the journal will be launched in 2017. The journal, in the first instance, will be published by the Centre for the History of Emotions.

EHCS is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal dedicated to understanding emotions as historically and culturally-situated phenomena and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience, societies, cultures and environments. The editors are now accepting submissions.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. We aim to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices. We are interested in multidisciplinary approaches (qualitative and quantitative) from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and related disciplines.

We also invite papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts; and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. EHCS also accepts reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

For more details or to submit a contribution, please email:
editemotions@gmail.com

Editors
Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide
Andrew Lynch, The University of Western Australia

« Sensible Moyen Âge » lauréat 2016 du prix Augustin Thierry de l’Académie Française

51WeZLtpkJL._SX317_BO1,204,203,200_C’est avec un immense plaisir que nous avons appris que  Sensible Moyen Âge avait été récompensé par l’Académie Française (prix Augustin Thierry). Merci aux membres du jury qui ont pris le soin de nous lire et à l’Académie de mettre ainsi en valeur l’histoire des « façons de sentir » qui possède des racines profondes dans l’historiographie médiévale francophone.

 

CFP « Fear ». 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference (Los Angeles)

Source : Fabula

CALL FOR PAPERS

21st Annual Graduate Student Conference

Department of French & Francophone Studies

University of California, Los Angeles

20-21 October 2016

http://uclaffsconference2016.weebly.com/

Keynote Speaker: Tracy Sharpley-Whiting, Vanderbilt University

                                                        FEAR

Discourses of fear dominate our contemporary moment. In this so-called “Age of Terrorism,” fear knows no borders, spreads quickly, and provokes the fearful to react in unpredictable ways. Politicians lash out and make shows of strength; citizens march en masse while immigrant families take flight; journalists proclaim “même pas peur!” while young people turn to newer forms of media to express their disillusionment and reshape pervasive stereotypes. At the same time, the causes—or perceived causes—of fear can be as varied as these reactions. Though opinion polls might define fear in terms of “terrorism,” “immigration,” or “globalization,” these kinds of categories often obfuscate and conflate more than they clarify.

Using fear as a framework of analysis, we propose to explore how it permeates the discourses of literature, art, and history, in its overt and covert forms. In literature, for example, we tend to associate French medieval epics with the fear of losing territory and influence. How might fears regarding religious conversion undergird these stories? Turning to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, humanists of these epochs were motivated by an anxious desire to claim themselves as the inheritors of ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Could we argue that this ambition reflects an unstated fear of not measuring up to these models? France in the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was rocked by revolutions. How might material fears such as hunger have intertwined with ideological fears of persecution and repression to inspire social, political, and cultural change?

In the face of repressive regimes from Indochina to Vichy France, from Haiti to Cameroon, dissidents could face severe, or even lethal, punishment. How does the fear of denunciation give rise to coded writings that criticize and subvert the status quo?

In and beyond these contexts, how does fear cloud reason or induce clarity? Can it also have positive, not simply negative, effects? When is fear “natural” and when is it not? Who plays a role in shaping these perceptions? How and by whom is it incited and manipulated, diverted and channeled, coped with, suppressed and overcome? To what end?

For the 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference of the UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies, we seek to explore the reverberations of fear in French and Francophone literatures, languages, arts, cultures, and histories across time periods and disciplines. We understand fear to include empirical and conceptual engagements with the notions of terror, horror, panic, and phobia. We are interested in how these may be connected to creative endeavor, literary and artistic movements, political and economic gain, and aesthetic and cultural transformations. Our aim is to address concerns of importance to scholars in literature, history, film and media studies, art history, sociology, anthropology, gender studies, and philosophy.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

In what cases does fear underlie opinions, decisions, and reactions?

How is fear instrumentalized and exploited?

How does fear work covertly, surreptitiously, or secretly? How can it be disguised? In what ways does the need for aesthetic and social ideals of “purity” and “order” reflect underlying fears?

What causes fear to be politicized or depoliticized?

How does fear legitimate or justify? Unify or divide?

In what ways is fear an affective experience?

How does fear blend with other emotions and states, such as love, desire, obsession, and fascination?

When is fear unacknowledged or even suppressed?

In what ways does fear create confusion, incite hysteria, and/or suspend reason?

How does fear cause paralysis? Or can it provoke action?

How does fear limit expression? Conversely, how can it engender creative response?

When does fear lead to protection and security for some and an amplification of fear for others?

Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer) in English or French, along with your paper title, affiliation, contact information, and biography (75 words) to uclafrenchgradconf2016@gmail.com. Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes in length.

Our deadline for submissions is July 15, 2016.

Compte rendu de « Ordering Emotions in Europe, 1100-1800 » (TMR)

Source : The Medieval Review

Broomhall, Susan, ed., Ordering Emotions in Europe, 1100-1800,  Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions. Leiden: Brill, 2015. Pp. xvi, 319. $163.00. ISBN: 978-9-00430-509-0.

Reviewed by Barbara H. Rosenwein
Loyola University Chicago
brosenw@gmail.com

Although not called a <i>Festschrift</i>, this collection of articles by mainly British and Australian scholars is a tribute to Philippa Maddern, Founding Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, whose untimely death in 2014 left many colleagues both near and far (including this reviewer) in mourning. Susan Broomhall, Maddern’s colleague and a scholarly dynamo who has published (by my count) six collections of essays since 2008, here adds another book to the burgeoning field of the History of Emotions.

« Ordering emotions » refers, according to Broomhall, to how emotions and cognition work together. Broomhall outlines three ways to understand emotions’ role in « ordering » thought. In the first, the researcher seeks to understand how past theories put together « emotion » and « thought. » In the second, the researcher asks how such theories were « enacted…as social and emotional practices. » The third way asks how emotional practices shaped thought, including theories of emotion and cognition.

The first approach is more or less a part of the history of ideas: it looks at ideas about emotions, about cognition, and about the ways they were said to interact. The second adheres to what might be called the « performative » view of emotions, but with a twist. For while many scholars talk about the expression of emotions in everyday life as a sort of performance or practice, Broomhall’s formulation suggests that what is enacted are the theories themselves. This suggests another way to think of « emotionology, » the approach to emotions first advocated by Peter and Carol Stearns, who looked at how advice books for the middle classes influenced behavior and childhood upbringing. The third approach has rarely been so explicitly formulated, but it is implicit, for example, in Damian Boquet and Piroska Nagy’s recent book, <i>Sensible moyen âge</i> (2015), where they argue that the experience of Christ’s Passion led to changes in ideas about the passions.

Thus this book poses questions at the very cutting edge of the History of Emotions. Moreover, the introduction (by Broomhall) provides a good overview of the many issues that researchers in the field confront today. Yet the thirteen essays that follow, ranging over nearly a millennium and taking up disparate topics, cluster around the first two approaches–the changing ways in which Europeans between 1100 and 1800 conceived of the « ordering » of the emotions, and the ways in which emotional « practice » carried out elements of the reigning theory (or theories) of emotions. The third way is rarely attempted. And, indeed, it is the first approach, the one that looks at theory, that is the most fully successful (if also the least ambitious). The point is easily made if we regroup the chapters by theme.

Five chapters focus on theories alone without making claims about practice. In chapter one, Juanita Feros Ruys, « Nine Angry Angels, » explains how scholastic thinkers tried to reconcile the theoretical order of the angels with their ideas about angelic feelings. If the angels were burning with various forms of love (as these thinkers argued), why did some angels rebel against God? The answers witness to a lively concern among the Schoolmen about the disruptive effects of the emotions. In chapter two, Clare Monagle, « Christ’s Masculinity, » takes up the ways in which Peter Lombard thought about the gendering of Christ and his « embodied emotional identity » (32). In effect, Monagle argues, Peter Lombard « masculinized » theology, allowing it to be accessed only by those with training in the <i>ordo rationis</i> (the order of reason), namely « the elite clerical men who attended the schools » (40). In chapter three, Carol Williams shows how theories of the modes of medieval music were understood to affect both morals and behavior. Although plainchant had strict rules, vernacular music was often exempt from these theoretical strictures. This allowed it to express emotions with greater intensity, though some thinkers found ways to accept passionate emotion in plainchant as well. Chapter eight, « Living Anxiously, » by Danijela Kambaskovic concentrates on theories of the senses rather than of the emotions. The « anxiety » in the title refers to an overall « anxious interest in orderly government of the senses » (161). While early modern writers often included « internal senses » such as imagination in their discussions, Kambaskovic focuses on the five that are recognized today. In chapter twelve, « Androgyny and the Fear of Demonic Intervention, » François Soyer explores ideas about ambiguous sexuality, gender, and demonic possession in the early modern Iberian Peninsula. Theologians generally agreed that sexual organs could not actually be transformed by demons, though demons might spread the illusion of such a change. But when it came to trying a woman for the charge of having a penis, inquisitors were willing to convict her of making a pact with the devil in order to have a male member. Soyer is interested in whether popular and elite attitudes differed regarding the role of the demons. Although it seems that popular opinion attributed greater powers to the demons, Soyer concludes that « there was certainly no clear-cut divergence of attitudes » (260).

Touching on the issue of theory turned into practice are six chapters. Very interesting as they are, they also suggest how difficult it is to see precisely <i>how</i> ideas become action. In chapter four, Spencer Young, « Avarice, Emotions, and the Family, » argues that when medieval theorists said that avarice corrupted moral norms, their ideas eventually found their way to popular preachers and thus were imbibed by « late medieval Christians » (71). Most of the essay, however, is about the various ideas moralists held regarding avarice and emotional effects. For example, they railed against the love of children because it prevented fathers from giving their wealth away to charities. In chapter six, « Nicholas of Modruš’s <i>De consolatione</i> (1465-1466), » Han Baltussen takes up a treatise aimed at « grief management » (105). Nicholas’s work, Baltussen argues, was « a stepping stone » (108) in the history of attitudes toward grief. Without doubt, it was meant to guide people. But its actual effects on practice remain unexplored. In chapter nine, Raphaële Garrod looks at « Early Modern Jesuit Discourses about Affects, » taking up in particular the writings of Francisco Suárez and Nicolas Caussin on motherhood. Garrod shows how Caussin tried to turn high-flown theory into « practice » in a letter that he wrote to a grieving mother: she should first feel the full extent of her pain, then recognize that her sorrow came from her Christian imperfection, and finally find solace in the promise of the afterlife. Did the mother put the advice to use? No doubt she tried to do so. In chapter ten, « Anatomy of a Passion, » Louis Charland and R.S. White understand the mad jealousy of Leontes in Shakespeare’s <i>The Winter’s Tale</i> as performing (literally) the theory of the passions of Thomas Wright (d. 1623). While their ultimate purpose is to contribute to our understanding of modern clinical issues, the bulk of their essay explores the two theoretical treatises and their « mirroring » in Shakespeare’s play. Yasmin Haskell’s study, « Arts and Games of Love » in chapter eleven, seeks to discover how classical and Christian ideas about friendship were employed by the Jesuits in « a flurry of poetic activity » (230). The poems were meant to cultivate appropriate homosocial bonds within the order and to sensitize its members to imagine themselves in the place of others in order to « harvest souls at all levels of European society and in the overseas missions » (242). Chapter thirteen, « Medical Effects and Affects, » by Robert L. Weston explores the emotions–mainly negative ones–that arose in the course of correspondence between ailing patients and their doctors in early modern France. Here we see some of the ways in which popular and learned ideas about the passions and disease informed the ways that people talked about themselves and others.

Only two chapters try to show how practice influenced theory. In chapter five, Louise D’Arcens, « Affective Memory across Time, » asserts that Christine de Pizan’s <i>The Book of the City of Ladies</i> used medieval conventions of memory to create a work that would elicit, at one and the same time, male admiration of women rather than derision and female « pride, safety, and sociability instead of shame, fear, and isolation » (88). Here, however, Christine was not quite a theorist nor quite a practitioner but rather a sort of emotional orchestrator, hoping to change the emotional practices she found around her. In chapter seven, « Hearts on Fire, » Susan Broomhall looks at « a richly illustrated manuscript » (121) prepared in 1578 for the French royal court by an apothecary, Nicolas Houel, who hoped to appeal to the « fellow feeling, compassion, and love » of the king and the Catholic citizens of Paris. This manuscript was one of several aimed at getting donations for Houel’s pet project: a charitable institution to treat the poor, infirm, and elderly while offering education to boys and girls. The manuscript’s text and illustrations, Broomhall argues, « performed » the « emotional acts, expressions and gestures » (121) that Houel derived from his (lay) understanding of contemporary theological and psychological theories and his expectations regarding « the emotional and spiritual practices of his audience » (133). Broomhall shows how Church teachings (e.g. that contrition required recognition of God’s sacrifice) shaped the « performance » of Houel’s manuscript (where both text and illustrations demonstrated that sacrifice) and how such teachings were deployed for purposes (such as Houel’s charity) for which they were not originally designed. But it is only when treating (all too briefly) the civic culture of the Parisian professionals that Broomhall is able to show how Houel’s treatise transformed <i>practices</i> per se into a theory of communal compassion.

In sum, this book offers many worthy–and, indeed, several brilliant–essays in the history of emotion. But it also highlights the challenges posed by the field. It is much easier to talk about various theories of emotion than it is to show how those theories were turned into practice. And, at least from the evidence here, it is very difficult to trace a direct line between emotional practices and the creation of theories of emotion.

Compte rendu de « Emotions in Medieval Arthurian Literature » (TMR)

Source : The Medieval Review

Brandsma, Frank, Carolyne Larrington, Corinne Saunders, eds, Emotions in Medieval Arthurian Literature: Body, Mind, Voice, Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2015. Pp. 210. $99.00. ISBN: 978-1-84384-421-1.

Reviewed by Christine Ferlampin-Acher
Université Rennes 2 France / Institut Universitaire de France
christine.ferlampin-acher@univ-rennes2.fr

L’histoire des émotions, en particulier médiévales, a donné lieu à de nombreuses recherches dans la dernière décennie, comme en témoignent celles de Piroska Nagy et Damien Boquet. [1] Divers travaux, dans des perspectives variées, centrés sur le Moyen Âge ou embrassant un plus large spectre chronologique, en histoire de la philosophie et de la théologie, dans une perspective anthropologique ou dans le cadre des <i>gender studies</i>, rendent compte de l’essor de l’étude des émotions (<i>emotionology</i>). [2] Les rires et sourires, d’une part, les larmes d’autre part, qui manifestent les émotions, ont été l’objet d’un certain nombre d’études littéraires et historiques. [3]

La littérature arthurienne a elle aussi pris le <i>affective turn</i> et le <i>Arthurian Emotions Project</i>, autour de F. Brandsma, C. Larrington et C. Saunders, a organisé des sessions lors des deux derniers congrès internationaux arthuriens, en 2011 à Bristol et en 2014 à Bucarest (sur les émotions positives). Le présent volume rend compte des travaux de 2011 et aborde, dans une perspective comparatiste, la place du corps, de l’esprit et de la voix dans la construction textuelle de l’émotion.

Une première partie s’intéresse aux cadres conceptuels des représentations des émotions, à partir des approches contemporaines (philosophie, psychologie, neurosciences, anthropologie…) et des savoirs médiévaux (théorie des humeurs en particulier); une seconde partie étudie comment le corps, l’esprit et la voix rendent compte des émotions dans des textes arthuriens variés, français, anglais, moyen néerlandais et norvégiens, de Chrétien de Troyes au XVe siècle.

L’introduction, par les trois auteurs (1-10), pose le problème de l’expression de l’émotion dans le texte médiéval en partant du constat que, si elle est en général aisément perçue par le lecteur moderne (l’exemple est pris de la scène de décapitation du <i>Chevalier Vert</i> jouée à par une classe d’élèves), elle pose des problèmes méthodologiques quand il s’agit de l’étudier, dans la mesure où les mentalités (au sens large) sont différentes. Cette constatation impose de s’intéresser à la dimension philosophique de la question dans une perspective diachronique. L’introduction balaie diverses approches de l’émotion, en partant de Descartes, Spinoza et Hume, jusqu’à Deleuze et Guattari, en passant par Husserl, Heidegger et Merleau-Ponty, et en prenant en compte l’apport essentiel et récent des neurosciences. Constatant que les études médiévales se sont appropriées désormais les études sur les émotions, les auteurs soulignent l’intérêt du champ arthurien, en particulier dans sa dimension comparatiste: la matière arthurienne est riche en merveilles, en surnaturel, en peurs et en amours, et fournit une gamme variée d’émotions (plus que la chanson de geste ou l’hagiographie), et la perspective comparatiste rend possible l’évaluation des reconfigurations liées aux transferts linguistiques et culturels. L’angle d’approche (le corps, l’esprit, la voix) permet d’aborder la relation complexe entre l’action et l’émotion, essentielle dans les récits héroïques que sont les textes arthuriens.

Jane Gilbert (« Being-in-the-Arthurian-World: Emotion, Affect and Magic in the <i>Prose Lancelot</i>, Sartre and Jay, » 13-30) met en regard la philosophie sartrienne et le <i>Lancelot en prose</i>: l’émotion, comme retrait en soi ou ouverture au monde (douleur du roi Ban d’une part, joie de Lancelot d’autre part), peut s’étudier à partir des oppositions intérieur/extérieur, passif/actif. Dans le <i>Lancelot en prose</i>, un lien est établi entre pensée magique et intensité émotive et deux façons d’être au monde sont mises en évidence. La deuxième partie de l’étude s’appuie sur les neurosciences et sur Martin Jay pour analyser entre autres points la spécificité des romans en prose par rapport aux romans en vers, pour ce qui est de la représentation des émotions et de la relation à la pensée magique, en mettant en évidence deux types de rapport à la magie et à l’immédiateté du monde et de l’émotion, entre désenchantement et réenchantement.

Dans « Mind, Body and Affect in Medieval English Arthurian Romance » (31-45), Corinne Saunders s’appuie sur les représentations médiévales, pour la plupart héritées de l’Antiquité. Si l’on considère souvent le héros arthurien comme essentiellement tourné vers l’action, il n’en demeure pas moins que l’affect occupe une très grande place dans les romans. L’exemple du Chevalier au Lion, dont le comportement est éclairé par les représentations médiévales de la mélancolie, le prouve. A partir d’un corpus allant du roman de Chrétien à <i>Ywain and Gawain</i> et à Malory, en passant par <i>Sir Launfal</i> de Thomas Chester et <i>Sir Gawain and the Green Knight</i>, l’émotion peut être exprimée par une inflation du vocabulaire de l’émotion (répété), par des dialogues, voire des pensées intérieures, par des manifestations physiques: l’article dégage les spécificités de chaque témoin. A partir d’un savoir et de représentations communes, chaque texte noue à sa façon la connexion entre l’esprit, le corps et l’affect.

Andrew Lynch, dans « ‘What cheer?’ Emotion and Action in the Arthurian World » (46-63), aborde à partir de trois textes anglais s’étendant dans le temps, le <i>Brut</i> de Layamon (début du XIIIe siècle), <i>Sir Launfal</i> de Thomas Chester (fin du XIVe siècle) et <i>Le Morte Darthur</i> (1469), le problème des relations entre action et émotion. Dans le premier texte, l’émotion est liée au politique et à l’action. Le second récit est centré sur l’individu. <i>Sir Launfal</i>, faisant réapparaître le héros une fois par an, propose un autre dénouement que le lai de Marie de France, et la joie d’amour, féerique, et la joie curiale, incompatibles dans le texte français, sont complémentaires dans le texte anglais. Chez Malory, le terme <i>cheer</i> sert de marqueur émotionnel, à la fois individuel et collectif, lié à l’action et dépassant celle-ci. La diversité et l’amplitude des problématiques et des réponses proposées rendent compte de l’importance de l’approche par les émotions, dans la mesure où celles-ci dépassent largement le cadre de la narration stricte.

Dans « Ire, Peor and their Somatic Correlate in Chrétien’s Chevalier de la Charrette » (67-86), Anatole Pierre Fuksas prend en compte à la fois la mise en texte des émotions et l’effet produit sur le lecteur (en s’appuyant en particulier sur les neurosciences et la simulation induite par la lecture). Il étudie les manifestations somatiques de la peur et de la colère, en prenant en considération le large spectre sémantique des termes <i>ire</i> et <i>peor</i>, ainsi que les variantes des manuscrits donnant le texte de Chrétien. La mise en évidence de caractères miroirs, qui suggèrent au lecteur comment réagir, de l’empathie à la création du sens, éclaire le fonctionnement et le rôle des émotions dans la lecture. L’auteur montre que les émotions sont des éléments essentiels dans le système narratif et qu’elles déterminent des communautés émotionnelles, qui peuvent être genrées, mais restent suffisamment générales pour être comprises par tous.

Anne Baden-Daintree, dans « Kingship and the Intimacy in the Alliterative <i>Morte Arthure</i> » (87-104), s’interroge sur les dimensions collective et privée du chagrin d’Arthur à la mort de Gauvain. L’approche genrée suggère que le chagrin des hommes est préalable à la vengeance, et a une dimension collective, comme dans les chansons de geste. Le deuil intime d’Arthur tend à le féminiser, questionne sa virilité, tandis que le geste de recueillir le sang de Gauvain, christique, prend un sens profane quand est en jeu la vengeance. L’excès féminin que manifeste le deuil du roi prélude à la vengeance, convoquant l’espace public.

Dans « Tears and Lies: Emotions and the Ideals of Malory’s Arthurian World » (105-122), Raluca Radulescu s’intéresse à l’émotion dans ce qu’elle a d’excessif, par exemple dans la scène où Lancelot remet Guenièvre à Arthur. Le discours de Lancelot n’a pas d’équivalent dans <i>La Mort le Roi Artu</i> en français. Malory, convoquant un public invité à se projeter, suggère en confrontant Gauvain et Lancelot une réflexion sur le mauvais conseiller et une possible représentation des réalités politiques contemporaines. Les miroirs au prince contemporains, qui proposent des leçons sur la façon dont il convient de gérer les comportements (et en particulier émotionnels) permettent de contextualiser les réactions du public inscrit dans le texte aussi bien que celles du public lecteur médiéval.

La comparaison d’épisodes où Gauvain est cru mort, à tort, dans <i>Diu Crône</i> et des romans français centrés sur Gauvain (<i>Chevalier aux deux Epées</i> et <i>Atre Périlleux</i> en particulier) permet à Carolyne Larrington (« Mourning Gawein: Cognition and Affect in Diu Crône and Some French Gauvain-Texts, » 123-142) d’étudier la réponse de l’audience lorsque le chagrin repose sur une erreur et est donc inadéquat. Si la cour, dans le récit, éprouve de l’empathie, l’audience du récit, dont elle aurait pu être le miroir, se désolidarise, car elle en sait plus et elle éprouve à la fois le plaisir de la reconnaissance du topos et de la connivence avec le conteur. Le motif de la fausse mort, qui a rencontré un très vif succès, est un cas de figure particulièrement pertinent pour explorer les interactions complexes entre les émotions des personnages, individuels ou collectifs, et les émotions supposées de l’audience.

Dans « Emotion and Voice: <i>Ay</i> in Middle Dutch Arthurian Romances » (143-160), Frank Brandsma propose un bilan sur les exclamations et interjections qui sont des marqueurs d’émotion, dans un cadre général puis plus particulièrement dans les textes en moyen néerlandais, en soulignant la dimension orale et dramatique (au sens de théâtral) du roman médiéval ce qu’illustre particulièrement l’analyse des corrections de la compilation de <i>Lancelot</i>, qui ajoutent des interjections. Si ces interjections peuvent activer le rôle miroir du texte, F. Brandsma met surtout en évidence des fonctions plus fines caractérisant les emplois de <i>Ay</i>, comme la mise en valeur de l’émotion prédominante quand plusieurs émotions sont convoquées, ou la tendance à signaler surtout la tristesse, voire la peur et la colère. Ouvrant de nombreuses pistes (dont celle d’une répartition genrée des interjections) l’article montre que <i>Ay</i> est un bon indicateur de la diversité et de l’intensité des émotions dans les textes, qui apparaît surtout dans les moments dont l’impact est fort au niveau de la performance et de la lecture.

Sif Rikhardsdottir, dans « Translating Emotion : Vocalisation and Embodiment in <i>Yvain</i>, and <i>Ivens saga</i> » (161-180), compare les réactions des veuves à l’annonce de la mort de leur conjoint dans <i>Yvain</i> et dans les sagas norroises, en particulier l’adaptation d'<i>Yvain</i>, l'<i>Ivens saga</i>, et pose le problème de la transposition des représentations littéraires des émotions dans des langues et des cultures autres. Dans les sagas norroises, le vocabulaire des émotions est moins riche et moins varié que dans les textes français. Les actes, paroles ou réactions physiques, y sont plus fréquents que les émotions intérieures, et le motif de la veuve riant à la face de l’assassin est particulièrement frappant. Dans ces textes norrois, la parole comme le rire masquent l’émotion, qui prélude à la vengeance, alors que dans les textes français la parole révèle et représente l’émotion, qui s’exprime sans pour autant servir nécessairement d’embrayeur à la vengeance. Dans l’adaptation d’ <i>Yvain</i> Laudine adopte, non le comportement des veuves des sagas, mais celui de son modèle français. La traduction cependant allège l’évocation des manifestations du chagrin de Laudine, redondante dans le contexte scandinave.

Helen Cooper présente en clôture des remarques de synthèse, appuyée sur une étude de Malory (« Afterword: Malory’s Enigmatic Smiles, » 181-188), qui signale la difficulté à interpréter le rire et le sourire chez l’auteur anglais: l’émotion propose une énigme au lecteur qui invite à se confronter au détail du texte.

L’ouvrage est complété par une bibliographie (189-203) et un index des noms propres et notions (205-210).

Il s’agit d’un ouvrage particulièrement stimulant, ouvrant de nombreuses pistes comparatistes, transséculaires et transdisciplinaires, et mettant en place des jalons solides pour l’étude des émotions dans la littérature médiévale.

——–

Notes:

1. En particulier dans le cadre du projet EMMA (« Les Émotions au Moyen Âge »), qui, depuis 2006, s’est consacré à l’étude des émotions médiévales, sous la responsabilité de Damien Boquet et Piroska Nagy. Voir <i>Le sujet des émotions</i>, sous la dir. de Piroska Nagy et Damien Boquet, Paris, Beauchesne, 2009 et <i>La chair des émotions</i>, dir. Piroska Nagy et Damien Boquet, <i>Médiévales</i>, 61, 2011.

2. Voir l’article fondateur de C. Z. Stearns, « Emotionology. Clarifying the History of Emotions and Emotional Standards, » <i>American Historical Review</i> 90 (1985): 813-836, ainsi que B. H. Rosenwein, « Worrying about Emotions in History, » <i>American Historical Review</i> 107 (2002): 821-845. Pour une approche portant sur la littérature médiévale, voir Brindusa Griguriu, <i>Talent/Maltalent. Emotionologies liminaires de la littérature française</i>, Craiova, Editura Universitaria, 2012.

3. Pour un bilan déjà ancien, voir Barbara H. Rosenwein, « L’étude des émotions. Histoire de l’émotion: méthodes et approches, » <i>Cahiers de Civilisation médiévale</i> 49 (2006): 33-48.

Offre de poste : Professeur-e assistant-e en études littéraires et émotions (Univ de Genève)

Source : Université de Genève

Professeur-e assistant-e en études littéraires et émotions

Entité organisationnelle
Faculté des lettres
Section / Division
Services communs de la faculté des lettres
Fonction
Professeur-e assistant-e avec prétitularisation conditionnelle
Code fonction
PA
Classe maximum
24
Corps
Personnel enseignant
Taux d’activité
100 %
Délai d’inscription
01-10-2016
Référence
1930
Pièce(s) jointe(s)

Description du poste

Le-la professeur-e assistant-e en études littéraires et émotions est nommé-e pour une période de 3 ans; la nomination est renouvelable une fois pour une période de 3 ans au maximum. Le-la professeur-e assistant-e rémunéré-e par des fonds provenant du budget de l’Etat est nommé-e avec prétitularisation conditionnelle. Il-elle est soumis-e à deux évaluations au cours de son mandat en vue de son éventuelle titularisation à la fonction de professeur-e associé-e ou de professeur-e ordinaire.

Ses domaines de recherche et d’enseignement doivent porter sur les relations entre la littérature et les émotions. Une expertise dans le domaine de l’image, fixe ou animée, pourrait être considérée comme un atout.

Ses activités s’inscriront dans le cadre d’un des départements littéraires de la Faculté (départements de langue et littérature françaises, allemandes, anglaises, romanes, méditerranéennes, slaves, orientales ou est-asiatiques) et/ou dans le programme de littérature comparée.

Sa maîtrise orale et écrite de la langue française, ou son souhait de l’apprendre rapidement, est importante, une grande partie des enseignements et des recherches, au sein de l’Université de Genève, s’effectuant dans cette langue. La maîtrise de l’anglais, dans le cadre des séminaires avancés et des projets de recherche, est indispensable.

Titre et compétences exigés

Doctorat ès lettres ou titre jugé équivalent dans le domaine des études littéraires.

Entrée en fonction

1er septembre 2017 ou date à convenir

Contact

nadege.berdoz@unige.ch

Informations complémentaires

La candidature et les documents doivent parvenir, exclusivement en ligne, en cliquant sur le bouton ci-dessous « Postuler/Apply now ».


L’Université de Genève offre des conditions d’engagement motivantes dans un cadre de travail stimulant. En nous rejoignant, vous aurez l’occasion de mettre en valeur vos compétences ainsi que votre personnalité et contribuer activement au rayonnement d’une Institution fondée en 1559.

Dans une perspective de parité, l’Université encourage les candidatures du sexe sous-représenté.

Vient de paraître : Histoire intellectuelle des émotions, de l’Antiquité à nos jours

Antonello da Messina, Portrait d'un jeune homme, huile sur bois, v. 1470 Legs Benjamin Altman, 1913 Metropolitan Museum of Art www.metmuseum.org
Antonello da Messina, Portrait d’un jeune homme, huile sur bois, v. 1470
Legs Benjamin Altman, 1913
Metropolitan Museum of Art
www.metmuseum.org

D. Boquet et P. Nagy (dir.), Histoire intellectuelle des émotions, de l’Antiquité à nos jours, L’Atelier du Centre de recherches historiques, 16 (2016)

Nous avons le plaisir d’annoncer la parution en ligne, en texte intégral et libre d’accès, du tout dernier volume de notre programme EMMA intitulé : Histoire intellectuelle des émotions, de l’Antiquité à nos jours, sous la direction de Damien Boquet et Piroska Nagy.

Le recueil, composé de 14 articles, est paru dans la collection de L’Atelier du Centre de recherches historiques, la revue électronique du CRH, numéro 16, juin 2016.

Présentation et sommaire :

Ce recueil présente des textes issus de la cinquième rencontre du projet EMMA, EMotions au Moyen Âge. Projet interdisciplinaire, EMMA a toujours voulu discuter de l’histoire des émotions avec les non-historiens, les non-médiévistes, les spécialistes d’autres aires culturelles. Notre volume contient ainsi des travaux d’historiens de l’Occident et de la Chine, mais aussi de psychologues, de philosophes et d’un littéraire. Face à un domaine aussi complexe que l’histoire des émotions, la multiplicité des points de vue et des démarches est fondamentale. Entreprendre une « histoire intellectuelle des émotions », c’est avant tout une invitation à questionner nos outils théoriques et nos façons de penser l’émotion, en les faisant dialoguer avec celles des époques et des sociétés de notre enquête.

Présentation-discussion de « La Contagion des émotions » (B. Delaurenti)

AfficheDelaurentigroupebaillantWEBLundi 6 juin de 15h-18h

Présentation

Bâiller fait bâiller, pleurer fait pleurer, apercevoir une personne qui mange fait saliver : le livre de Béatrice Delaurenti, La contagion des émotions. Compassio, une énigme médiévale, Paris, « Classique Garnier », 2016, s’intéresse à la façon dont les expressions corporelles et psychologiques se conjuguent au Moyen Âge, à partir de l’analyse de la notion de compassion, propre à cette période, qui désigne les effets de contamination des mouvements émotionnels. A travers la trajectoire d’un mot et de ce qu’il révèle de cette société, l’enquête éclaire alors la culture savante des derniers siècles du Moyen Âge, attentive à intégrer l’être humain dans un univers qui le dépasse et l’englobe.

La séance, animée par Fanny Cosandey, comprendra une présentation de l’auteur et les interventions d’Alain Boureau (CRH-EHESS),  Gérard Jorland (CRH-CNRS) et Nicolas Weill-Parot (CRHEC, Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne).

Lieu

EHESS
Salle Jean-Pierre Vernant
190, avenue de France
75013 Paris

Le Moyen Âge des émotions : conférence à la Médiathèque de Poitiers (24 mai à 18h30)

Conférences du Moyen Âge

Localisation : Médiathèque François-Mitterrand
Catégorie : Conférences
Adresse : Médiathèque François-Mitterrand 4 rue de l’Université
Conditions : Tél. 05 49 52 31 51 Fax 05 49 52 31 60 mediatheque@mairie-poitiers.fr

  • – Le 24/05/2016

Mardi 24 mai

Découverte

Conférences du Moyen Âge

Le Moyen Âge : que d’émotions !

Par Damien Boquet, maître de conférences à l’Université d’Aix-Marseille.

Que peut-on savoir de la vie émotionnelle des femmes et des hommes du Moyen Âge ? Sur ce sujet longtemps négligé, les sources sont pourtant nombreuses : la littérature, l’iconographie, les chroniques, mais aussi la théologie et la médecine nous livrent mille indices de la place des émotions dans la vie intime et sociale. L’émotion au Moyen Âge irrigue la société, dans une diversité d’interprétations et une vitalité qui impressionnent.

Médiathèque François-Mitterrand, salle Jean-Richard-Bloch, à 18h30. 

Géographie des émotions – 2016

Source : ENS Ulm

Descriptif

Qu’est ce qui fait qu’un espace nous attire, nous effraie ou bien encore nous attriste ? Pourquoi tels espaces sont associés au plaisir, à la peur, au dégoût, à la tristesse, etc. ? Dans le cadre de ce séminaire, nous nous demanderons ce que les émotions permettent, au géographe, de comprendre à la manière dont on pratique et on se représente les espaces et nous envisagerons, en retour, ce que la géographie et les géographes peuvent avoir à dire sur les émotions. Comment le géographe peut-il rendre compte de ses émotions et de celles des autres ? Les émotions sont-elles un simple biais des enquêtes de terrain qui seraient certes à prendre en compte mais toujours en vue de les dépasser ou constituent-elles, au contraire, un objet d’étude géographique à part entière ? Ce séminaire vise à poser les bases d’une géographie (française ?) des émotions.

 

Pour vous inscrire à la liste de diffusion du séminaire, cliquez : ici

Pour consulter la page Facebook du séminaire, cliquez : ici

 

Planning

  • 7 janvier 2016 :
    • Pauline Guinard : introduction du séminaire
      • Présentation (voir document joint en bas de page)
    • Claire Brisson (Doctorante en géographie, Université Paris 4, ENEC) – Restituer l’émotion du géographe : penser le chercheur comme auteur. La figure du géo-graphe
      • Présentation (voir document joint en bas de page)

 

  • 18 février 2016 : 
    • Philippe Gervais-Lambony (Professeur de géographie,Université Paris Ouest Nanterre, UMR Lavue-Mosaïques) – La nostalgie est-elle une émotion ? La nostalgie est-elle géographique ?

 

  • 10 mars 2016 :

    • Judith Hayem (MCF en Anthropologie, Institut de Sociologie et Anthropologie Lille 1, Clersé UMR 8019) – Afrique du Sud : étapes d’un amour. De la difficulté et de l’usage d’avoir un rapport subjectif au terrain

 

  • 7 avril 2016 :

    • Dominique Chevalier (MCF-HDR en géographie, Université Lyon 1, UMR Environnement Ville et Société) et Isabelle Lefort (Professeur de géographie,Université Lyon 2, UMR Environnement Ville et Société) – Avec quels outils théoriques penser l’expérience touristique des lieux de mémoire ?

 

  • 12 mai 2016 :

    • Magali Reghezza (MCF-HDR en géographie, ENS, LGP) – De la peur à l’angoisse, du risque à l’incertitude

 

  • 26 mai 2016 :

    • Pauline Guinard (MCF à l’ENS, UMR LAVUE – Mosaïques, UMR IHMC (associée) et Bénédicte Tratnjek (Doctorante en géographie, Laboratoire junior Sciences dessinées ENS-Lyon) – Arts, émotions et géographie


Dates et horaires
 : une séance par mois, salle des conférences, 46 rue d’Ulm, le jeudi de 14h à 17h.

documents joints

Emotion and Evidence in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World

indexEmotion and Evidence in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World

PROGRAMME

09:30-10:00 Registration and Welcome (Prof Chris Williams, SHARE Head of School) 10:00-11:00 Session One: Emotion and Litigation

Anna Boeles Rowland (Oxford University) – Emotional Objects: Material Culture, the Emotional Turn and Marital Litigation in Late Medieval London.

Anna Field (Cardiff University) – Emotion and crimes against the coin in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England

11:00-11:30 Coffee

11:30-12:00 Keynote: Garthine Walker (Cardiff University) – Thinking, Feeling and Doing: Problematizing Emotions in the History of Early Modern Crime

12:00-13:00 Lunch
13:00-14:30 Session Two: Tracing Devotion

Kati Ihnat (Bristol University) – ‘Let no-one… be a friend to the Jews’: Searching for Christian emotions towards Jews in devotional sources

Laura Kalas Williams (Exeter University) – ‘The Birth of Fear and Loathing: the (Un)Making of Margery Kempe in Additional MS 61823’

Rachel Basch (Royal Holloway) – ‘“In the time of her adversity.” Recovering the emotions of bishops’ wives

14:30-15:00 Coffee

15:00-15:30 Keynote: Miri Rubin (Queen Mary University of London) – Emotion, Devotion and Evidence: The Work So Far

15:30-15:45 Break

15:45-17:15 Session Three: Proscription, Practice and Emotional Response

Abby Johns (Cardiff University) – Discovering Deviant Expressions of Grief in Popular Print

Emma Levitt (University of Huddersfield) – “The greater pity is!” Restoring English masculinity and pride in the reign of Edward IV

William Tullett (King’s College London) – Habituation, Emotion, and the Olfactory Archive of Eighteenth-Century England.

17:15-17:30 Closing Remarks
17:30 Drinks Reception – Room 4.45 of the John Percival Building

« Les Cafés de l’histoire » avec Piroska Nagy (Librairie Payot, Genève)

CIMG0764[4] CIMG0765[3]Mercredi 27 avril à 12h chez Payot Rive Gauche (Genève)

Piroska Nagy, professeure d’histoire du Moyen Âge, sera l’invitée des Cafés de l’Histoire organisés par Payot Libraire et la Maison de l’histoire pour son ouvrage « Sensible Moyen Âge » co-écrit avec Damien Boquet. Entrée libre. Débat animé par Guillemette Bolens, professeure de littérature à l’université de Genève.