CFP : Communities, Imaginations and Emotions in the Medieval Mediterranean

Source :  Universiteit Gent

Society for the Medieval Mediterranean – Conference 2017

The fifth biennial conference of the Society for the Medieval Mediterranean will take place at Ghent University from Monday 10th July to Wednesday 12th July 2017.

The theme of the conference is “Communities, Imaginations and Emotions in the Medieval Mediterranean”. We welcome papers from all disciplines that study emotions, imaginations and communities in, of and across the Medieval Mediterranean. This theme invites a variety of lines of inquiry, a number of which are suggested below. How were emotions produced, expressed and communicated? To what end were imaginations used and abused? In what ways were communities perceived and understood? What communalities and particularities are there? Which challenges do the literary, historical, archaeological and other sources pose in this respect?

The keynotes will be delivered by Professor Marina Rustow (Princeton) and Professor Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg).

Topics of the Conference

Topics of the conference include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Emotional and imagined communities
  • Selfing and othering
  • Identity and alterity, senses of belonging, ties that bond
  • Memory, nostalgia and the imagined or idealized past
  • Mirabilia, wonders and magic
  • Worldviews and other social schemata
  • Mobility across borders
  • Emotional and communal dimensions to identity
  • Honour and shame, social codes and values
  • Emotions bodily felt, orally expressed
  • Reading and sharing emotions
  • Methodological problems when inquiring emotions and imaginations


Call for papers and panels

We invite 200-300 word abstracts for individual 20-minute papers relating to the conference theme. Participants are encouraged to submit proposals for panels of 3 papers – in this case, the panel proposer should collate the three abstracts and submit them together, indicating clearly the rationale behind the planned panel. A pdf version of the call for papers and panels is accessible here.


First deadline:

Abstracts for individual papers and proposals for panels should be emailed to the conference email address ( by Monday 31st October 2016. Applicants will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper or panel by January 2017.

Autour de « Sensible Moyen Âge » : une émission de « Canal Savoir » (TV, Québec)

La chaîne de télévision québécoise Canal Savoir consacre une émission à notre livre Sensible Moyen Âge, présenté par Piroska Nagy qui répond aux questions de Guillaume Lamy. Première diffusion  mardi 27 septembre à 21h (heure de Montréal), mais l’émission est également disponible en ligne.




Making Love in the Twelfth Century


Source : University of Pennsylvania Press

Making Love in the Twelfth Century
« Letters of Two Lovers » in Context. A new translation with commentary by Barbara Newman

392 pages | 6 x 9
Cloth Jun 2016 | ISBN 978-0-8122-4809-8 | $59.95s | £39.00 | Add to cart
Ebook 2016 | ISBN 978-0-8122-9272-5 | $59.95s | £39.00 | About | Add to cart
A volume in the Middle Ages Series
View table of contents and excerpt

« This rich contribution to ongoing debate about the ‘Letters of Two Lovers’ is essential reading for scholars interested not only in Abelard and Heloise but also the Loire poets, Ovid in the Middle Ages, female authorship, literary letter-writing and history of the emotions. At the same time, it generously opens up these topics—central to the study of the literature of the twelfth century—to a broader readership. »—Elizabeth Tyler, University of York »Making Love in the Twelfth Century showcases Barbara Newman’s fine poetic sensibility and acute detective skills as she explores the secrets of a literary treasure of the twelfth century. In the course of rediscovering the Epistolae duorum amantium (Letters of Two Lovers) she makes the Latin literary culture of the High Middle Ages newly visible to us in all of its emotional intensity and formal beauty. This is far more than a translation and commentary: it is at once a distinctive contribution to literary history and a triumphant celebration of the literature of love. »—Rita Copeland, University of Pennsylvania

« With grace and learning, Barbara Newman illuminates the emotional and textual communities that created the Letters of Two Lovers and similar works of art and love. The translations are glowing, and Newman’s introduction and commentaries essential—not only for medievalists but also for anyone interested in amorous attachments. And who is not? »—Barbara H. Rosenwein, Loyola University Chicago

« Barbara Newman’s Making Love in the Twelfth Century makes a love affair in progress visible to the reader and shows the ‘making’—that is, composing—of love within a discursive tradition. »—C. Stephen Jaeger, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Nine hundred years ago in Paris, a teacher and his brilliant female student fell in love and chronicled their affair in a passionate correspondence. Their 116 surviving letters, some whole and some fragmentary, are composed in eloquent, highly rhetorical Latin. Since their discovery in the late twentieth century, the Letters of Two Lovers have aroused much attention because of their extreme rarity. They constitute the longest correspondence by far between any two persons from the entire Middle Ages, and they are private rather than institutional—which means that, according to all we know about the transmission of medieval letters, they should not have survived at all. Adding to their mystery, the letters are copied anonymously in a single late fifteenth-century manuscript, although their style and range of reference place them squarely in the early twelfth century.

Can this collection of correspondence be the previously lost love letters of Abelard and Heloise? And even if not, what does it tell us about the lived experience of love in the twelfth century?

Barbara Newman contends that these teacher-student exchanges bear witness to a culture that linked Latin pedagogy with the practice of ennobling love and the cult of friendship during a relatively brief period when women played an active part in that world. Newman presents a new translation of these extraordinary letters, along with a full commentary and two extended essays that parse their literary and intellectual contexts and chart the course of the doomed affair. Included, too, are two other sets of twelfth-century love epistles, the Tegernsee Letters and selections from the Regensburg Songs. Taken together, they constitute a stunning contribution to the study of the history of emotions by one of our most prominent medievalists.

Barbara Newman is John Evans Professor of Latin Language and Literature at Northwestern University. She is author and editor of many books, including God and the Goddesses: Vision, Poetry, and Belief in the Middle Ages, winner of the Haskins Medal of the Medieval Academy of America, and From Virile Woman to WomanChrist: Studies in Medieval Religion and Literature. Both are available from University of Pennsylvania Press.

Colloque : Owning Our Emotions — Emotion, Authenticity and the Self

Source : Philosophy. News, events and more from the Open University’s Philosophy Department

International Research Conference

21–22 September 2016
Senate House, London

Registration for this conference is now open
(closing date 8 September 2016)

To register, please visit the conference registration website here and follow the links and instructions. If you have any questions, please address any inquires to

Download the full Conference Programme

Our keynote speakers

  • Professor Monika Betzler, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Munich
  • Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, University of Birmingham
  • Professor Denis McManus, University of Southampton
  • Dr Carolyn Price, The Open University
  • Professor Fabrice Teroni, University of Geneva
  • Dr Jonathan Webber, University of Cardiff
  • Professor Christine Straehle, University of Ottowa*
  • Professor Justin White, Brigham Young University*
  • Mr Daniel Vanello, University of Warwick*

*selected by blind peer review

Conference themes

How do emotions relate to the self?  On one possible view, emotions stand outside the self: they reflect biological drives or cultural demands independent of – perhaps even inimical to – the subject’s own interests or values; when we act out of emotion, we are driven to act by psychological forces external to ourselves. But on another view, our emotional dispositions help to constitute who we are; words and deeds that come ‘from the heart’ are judged to have a special kind of worth, arising from their authenticity. In everyday contexts, people seem to think about emotion in both these ways, depending on the situation. But can these two views be reconciled? And if not, which view comes closer to the truth?
The purpose of this conference is to throw light on these questions, capitalising on the progress that has been made in the philosophy of emotion in recent years, as well as drawing on studies in the history of philosophy and on a range of philosophical traditions.

Directions for conference delegates

For a printable map of Senate House and nearest London underground and railway stations, please click on How to get to Senate House. Senate House is part of the University of London and helpful advice on different options for travel and transport are available here.

The conference is organized by the Philosophy Department of the Open University in conjunction with Department’s Reasons and Norms research group. It is supported by the Mind Association and by the Institute of Philosophy. For questions about the conference, please contact our conference administrator Ms Yvonne Bartley at


Conférence : Between the Lines: Discerning Affect and Emotion in Pre-Modern Texts, Columbia University, NY, 29-30 September 2016


All conference events will take place in the Columbia University Faculty House Seminar Room 1 with the exception of Thursday night’s dinner, which will take place in the Faculty House dining room.  Any changes to the venue will be posted in the entry foyer of the Faculty House. For directions to Faculty House, see:

THURSDAY, September 29th 2016:

Arrival, 3:00-3:15pm

Coffee and tea provided

Welcome, 3:15-3:30pm

Session #1: Teaching and Learning Emotion, 3:30-5:00pm

Irina Dumitrescu, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, moderator

“Embarrassment: Losing Face in Rhetorical School Texts of the Central Middle Ages”

Monika Otter, Dartmouth College

Swiðe swete to belcettan: Affective Eruptions in the Old English Boethius”

Jennifer A. Lorden, University of California, Berkeley

“Medieval Stupor”

Thomas Prendergast, College of Wooster

Coffee Break, 5:00-5:15pm

Keynote Lecture: « Making Up People Between the Lines, » 5:15-7:00pm

Fiona Somerset, University of Connecticut

Stephanie Trigg, University of Melbourne, introduction

FRIDAY, September 30th 2016

Arrival/Breakfast, 8:15-8:45am

Welcome, 8:45-9:00am

Session #2: Empathy and Compassion, 9:00-10:30am

Patricia Dailey, Columbia University, moderator

Car je n’ay plus sens ne memoire: Feeling Other People’s Demons in Medieval French Theater”

Andreea Marculescu, University of California, Irvine

“Emotional Contagion in the Middle Ages”

Beatrice Delaurenti, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociale

“Griselda’s Swoon: Historicizing Medieval Affect Alongside Emotion”

Glenn Burger, Queens College and CUNY Graduate Center

Coffee Break, 10:30-10:45am

Session #3: Images and Objects, 10:45am-12:15pm

Lauren Mancia, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, moderator

“Performing Emotion in the Sculpted Deposition”

Julia Perratore, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“Tears for Abraham? The Sacrifice of Isaac in Anglo-Saxon Imagination”

Shu-han Luo, Yale University

“Feeling in the Margins in Fifteenth-Century Prayer Books”

Sara M. Weisweaver, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Lunch, 12:15-1:30pm

Session #4: Affections in Community, 1:30-3:00pm

Piroska Nagy, Université du Québec à Montréal, moderator

“Private Emotions and Public Display: Normative Court Community in Castile-Leon, c. 1250-1350”

Kim Bergqvist, Stockholm University

“Can Emotions Make Law?: Collective Trauma, Apostasy and Legal Responsiveness in Fifteenth Century Austrian Jewry”

Tamar Menashe, Columbia University

“Jealousy (ghayra) in Pre-Modern Islamic Constructions of Masculinity”

Marion H. Katz, New York University

Break, 3:00-3:15pm

Session #5: Affective Genres, 3:15-4:45pm

Stephanie Trigg, University of Melbourne, moderator

“The Abstemious Affect of the Couplet Genre in Early Modern South Asian Devotional Poetry”

Manpreet Kaur, Columbia University

“Negative Interiority: Unruly Feelings in Premodern Korean Fiction”

Ksenia Chizhova, Princeton University

“Moving the Soul: Exegesis and Medieval Psychology in Simone Fidati’s De Gestis Domini Salvatoris »

Xavier Biron-Ouellet, Université du Québec à Montréal

Closing Discussion, 4:45-5:30pm

Jesus Rodriguez Velasco, Columbia University


Zorn und Macht in Texten des 12. Jahrhunderts (vient de paraître)

Source : De Gruyter

9783110472066Freienhofer, Evamaria

Verkörperungen von Herrschaft

Zorn und Macht in Texten des 12. Jahrhunderts

[Embodiments of Rule: Rage and Power in 12th Century Texts]

Series:Trends in Medieval Philology 32

Recent years have witnessed growing interest in anger as a literary and societal phenomenon. Delving into this topic, this work examines the ways that 12th century authors functionalized rage for their narratives of power and rule. An innovative aspect of the work is its cross-genre examination of texts that can be seen as key conceptualizations of early statehood.

Des émotions immorales, inconfortables et laides ?

The Danish historical journal temp is planning a special issue:

Uncomfortable, immoral, and ugly feelings
In recent decades the discipline of history has witnessed a tremendous increase the interest in emotions. Among other things, scholars have examined how cultures of emotions have emerged and changed. They have also looked at how historical actors have adopted and adapted the emotional repertoires that were socially acceptable in various historical contexts. In this temp issue we wish to explore a new and different strand within this field, that is, the affective moments and experiences that break with prevailing emotional norms. Through a focused attention on emotional disruptions as historical indicators of cultural shifts, we seek to shed light on the negative, morally reprehensible, uncomfortable or pathological feelings – as well as the titillating dangerous feelings.
Focusing on emotional practices deemed ignoble, raw, bad or ugly, essays will examine the historically variable relationship between morality, power, and affective practices. What role has feelings such as greed, envy, thirst for revenge, shame, apathy, or misplaced desire played in different contexts? How have historical actors handled unpleasant emotions? In what ways have negative feelings been used as a means of social regulation or contestation? When are feelings deemed inappropriate and how does that affect the social contexts within which they are practiced? How do “good” emotions turn “bad”?

We welcome contributions in English or Danish exploring any historical period and context.
Deadlines Deadline for Abstracts (min. ½ page): September 15th 2016
Article Deadline: September 15th 2017
Author Seminar: April 2017 (Deadline for Papers: One month before Author Seminar)
Please send contributions and possible questions to: The special issue is edited by an editorial group chaired by Karen Vallgårda and Nils Arne Sørensen.

«Ragionar d’amore». Il lessico delle emozioni nella lirica medievale (vient de paraître)

Source : SISMEL

medievi_09_ragionardamore«Ragionar d’amore». Il lessico delle emozioni nella lirica medievale

A cura di Alessio Decaria e Lino Leonardi
Bros. pp. VIII-324, € 44
Collana mediEVI, 09
anno 2015
isbn 978-88-8450-683-2

Premessa di L. Leonardi. R. Antonelli, Emozioni, canone letterario, Europa – R. Distilo, Etimi e lemmi del « trobar »: fra stati d’animo e sentimenti eccessivi – R. Viel, Appunti su genere e lessico in Giraut de Borneil e Bertran de Born – P. Squillacioti, Sul lessico del disamore nella poesia trobadorica – F. Costantini, Referenti esterni del lessico trobadorico dell’affettività – G. Gubbini, Patologia amorosa. Due fenomeni nella lirica d’oïl – M. Brea, La expresión de las emociones en la lírica gallego-portuguesa (primera aproximación) – L. Leonardi, L’evoluzione del lessico lirico medievale: il filtro italiano – P. Larson, Crudele ed amaroso amaro – G. Marrani, « Parcere subiectis ». Opposizioni e dissonanze nelle implorazioni amorose fra Dante e Cino da Pistoia – A. Decaria, Lessico delle emozioni e lessico familiare nei poeti toscani fra Due e Trecento – F. Zinelli, Personificazioni di emozioni nella poesia comica di età comunale (« Malinconia », « Tristezza » e le altre in Cecco Angiolieri, Bindo Bonichi, Buccio di Aldobrandino e in un anonimo serventese « De claustro animae ») – R. Rea, Appunti sul lessico e la psicologia della paura nei « Rerum vulgarium fragmenta » – M. S. Lannutti, « Timor » e « fortitudo », « desiderium » e « temperantia » nei due primi madrigali del Canzoniere petrarchesco. Indici.

Special Issue on ‘Emotion and Change’: Emotions: History, Culture, Society

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

EHCS invites scholars exploring the question ‘What differences do emotions make in processes of change?’ to propose articles for inclusion in a special issue on ‘Emotion and Change’, to be published in the first half of 2018. 

One of the key issues for scholars who study emotions is the role that they play in processes of social, cultural, historical, political, economic and other forms of change. Particularly relevant to such discussions have been studies of collective or mass emotions and their relationship to social or political movements; the uses of emotion to manipulate groups, such as through mass media, or the key role of affection in childhood development, that plays a significant role in adult life chances and outcomes. Teasing out the role emotion plays in such processes – is it an actor in its own right; a tool to be utilised; or something of both? – remains a significant area of debate in the field. More broadly, an interrogation of emotion can rethink what scholars should look for when assessing change. Is change something that happens at the level of individuals, groups or societies; is feeling enough to mark change or does it have to be followed by action, and if so what counts as action? If emotions are at stake in processes of change, how do they operate to enable change? How is emotion mediated, shared, transformed and put to work? What role do the arts, literature, technology and more play in such emotional processes of change?

The above questions and discussion are intended to stimulate ideas and generate discussion but should not be viewed as limiting. Contributions are welcome that seek to reimagine the terms of this question to further our understanding of the operation of emotion in human life.

Proposals are now invited for 6,000-8,000 word articles (including notes) that fall under this remit and should include a c.500 word abstract of the proposed submission, a short biography of the author and contact information. Please send proposals and enquiries to by 31 July 2016. More information will be available shortly on our website.

Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS) Journal

Source : ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions

The Society for the History of Emotions, a project of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, 1100-1800, is pleased to announce its new journal Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS). We anticipate that the first issue of the journal will be launched in 2017. The journal, in the first instance, will be published by the Centre for the History of Emotions.

EHCS is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal dedicated to understanding emotions as historically and culturally-situated phenomena and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience, societies, cultures and environments. The editors are now accepting submissions.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. We aim to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualised and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices. We are interested in multidisciplinary approaches (qualitative and quantitative) from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and related disciplines.

We also invite papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts; and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. EHCS also accepts reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

For more details or to submit a contribution, please email:

Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide
Andrew Lynch, The University of Western Australia

« Sensible Moyen Âge » lauréat 2016 du prix Augustin Thierry de l’Académie Française

51WeZLtpkJL._SX317_BO1,204,203,200_C’est avec un immense plaisir que nous avons appris que  Sensible Moyen Âge avait été récompensé par l’Académie Française (prix Augustin Thierry). Merci aux membres du jury qui ont pris le soin de nous lire et à l’Académie de mettre ainsi en valeur l’histoire des « façons de sentir » qui possède des racines profondes dans l’historiographie médiévale francophone.


CFP « Fear ». 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference (Los Angeles)

Source : Fabula


21st Annual Graduate Student Conference

Department of French & Francophone Studies

University of California, Los Angeles

20-21 October 2016

Keynote Speaker: Tracy Sharpley-Whiting, Vanderbilt University


Discourses of fear dominate our contemporary moment. In this so-called “Age of Terrorism,” fear knows no borders, spreads quickly, and provokes the fearful to react in unpredictable ways. Politicians lash out and make shows of strength; citizens march en masse while immigrant families take flight; journalists proclaim “même pas peur!” while young people turn to newer forms of media to express their disillusionment and reshape pervasive stereotypes. At the same time, the causes—or perceived causes—of fear can be as varied as these reactions. Though opinion polls might define fear in terms of “terrorism,” “immigration,” or “globalization,” these kinds of categories often obfuscate and conflate more than they clarify.

Using fear as a framework of analysis, we propose to explore how it permeates the discourses of literature, art, and history, in its overt and covert forms. In literature, for example, we tend to associate French medieval epics with the fear of losing territory and influence. How might fears regarding religious conversion undergird these stories? Turning to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, humanists of these epochs were motivated by an anxious desire to claim themselves as the inheritors of ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Could we argue that this ambition reflects an unstated fear of not measuring up to these models? France in the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was rocked by revolutions. How might material fears such as hunger have intertwined with ideological fears of persecution and repression to inspire social, political, and cultural change?

In the face of repressive regimes from Indochina to Vichy France, from Haiti to Cameroon, dissidents could face severe, or even lethal, punishment. How does the fear of denunciation give rise to coded writings that criticize and subvert the status quo?

In and beyond these contexts, how does fear cloud reason or induce clarity? Can it also have positive, not simply negative, effects? When is fear “natural” and when is it not? Who plays a role in shaping these perceptions? How and by whom is it incited and manipulated, diverted and channeled, coped with, suppressed and overcome? To what end?

For the 21st Annual Graduate Student Conference of the UCLA Department of French and Francophone Studies, we seek to explore the reverberations of fear in French and Francophone literatures, languages, arts, cultures, and histories across time periods and disciplines. We understand fear to include empirical and conceptual engagements with the notions of terror, horror, panic, and phobia. We are interested in how these may be connected to creative endeavor, literary and artistic movements, political and economic gain, and aesthetic and cultural transformations. Our aim is to address concerns of importance to scholars in literature, history, film and media studies, art history, sociology, anthropology, gender studies, and philosophy.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

In what cases does fear underlie opinions, decisions, and reactions?

How is fear instrumentalized and exploited?

How does fear work covertly, surreptitiously, or secretly? How can it be disguised? In what ways does the need for aesthetic and social ideals of “purity” and “order” reflect underlying fears?

What causes fear to be politicized or depoliticized?

How does fear legitimate or justify? Unify or divide?

In what ways is fear an affective experience?

How does fear blend with other emotions and states, such as love, desire, obsession, and fascination?

When is fear unacknowledged or even suppressed?

In what ways does fear create confusion, incite hysteria, and/or suspend reason?

How does fear cause paralysis? Or can it provoke action?

How does fear limit expression? Conversely, how can it engender creative response?

When does fear lead to protection and security for some and an amplification of fear for others?

Please send an abstract (300 words or fewer) in English or French, along with your paper title, affiliation, contact information, and biography (75 words) to Presentations should be no longer than 20 minutes in length.

Our deadline for submissions is July 15, 2016.